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dc.contributor.authorWilkinson, James M
dc.date.accessioned2010-11-04T11:38:24Z
dc.date.available2010-11-04T11:38:24Z
dc.date.issued1987-09
dc.identifier.citationThe application of cost-benefit analysis when considering action to reduce environmental dose rates in hospitals. 1987, 60 (717):919-22 Br J Radiolen
dc.identifier.issn0007-1285
dc.identifier.pmid3117160
dc.identifier.doi10.1259/0007-1285-60-717-919
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10541/114706
dc.description.abstractCost-benefit analysis, in which a monetary value is assigned to radiation-induced health detriment, is used to establish whether a proposed course of action to reduce the dose rate in a particular environment is reasonable in the "as low as reasonably achievable" context. The instantaneous dose rate is used in conjunction with a use factor and a man-occupancy factor to establish a dose accumulation rate. This, in turn, is used to calculate what capital expenditure on radiation protection measures is reasonable. Such an approach provides an objective method of assessing and comparing radiation protection problems and leads to better consistency in allocating available resources.
dc.language.isoenen
dc.subject.meshCost-Benefit Analysis
dc.subject.meshGreat Britain
dc.subject.meshHumans
dc.subject.meshOccupational Diseases
dc.subject.meshRadiation Dosage
dc.subject.meshRadiation Protection
dc.subject.meshRadiology Department, Hospital
dc.titleThe application of cost-benefit analysis when considering action to reduce environmental dose rates in hospitals.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentRegional Department of Medical Physics and Bioengineering, Christie Hospital and Holt Radium Institute, Withington, Manchester.en
dc.identifier.journalBritish Journal of Radiologyen
html.description.abstractCost-benefit analysis, in which a monetary value is assigned to radiation-induced health detriment, is used to establish whether a proposed course of action to reduce the dose rate in a particular environment is reasonable in the "as low as reasonably achievable" context. The instantaneous dose rate is used in conjunction with a use factor and a man-occupancy factor to establish a dose accumulation rate. This, in turn, is used to calculate what capital expenditure on radiation protection measures is reasonable. Such an approach provides an objective method of assessing and comparing radiation protection problems and leads to better consistency in allocating available resources.


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