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dc.contributor.authorFisher, David R
dc.contributor.authorHendry, Jolyon H
dc.date.accessioned2010-11-02T17:51:56Z
dc.date.available2010-11-02T17:51:56Z
dc.date.issued1988-01
dc.identifier.citationDose fractionation and hepatocyte clonogens: alpha/beta congruent to 1-2 Gy, and beta decreases with increasing delay before assay. 1988, 113 (1):51-7 Radiat. Res.en
dc.identifier.issn0033-7587
dc.identifier.pmid3340725
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10541/114382
dc.description.abstractThe sensitivity to X-ray dose fractionation was assessed for hepatocytes forming colonies in fat pads in mice. When the cells were assayed 1 day after the last irradiation the alpha/beta ratio was 1.0-1.6 depending on the method of analysis. The alpha/beta ratio describing the shape of the single-dose survival curve was much higher, and it did not predict the response to fractionation. When the assay was delayed for 10 months after the fractionated irradiation, the alpha/beta ratio was 1.9-2.1, and the beta component showed the greatest change with time. It is concluded that hepatocytes respond to dose fractionation in a manner expected of a late-responding tissue, even when the cells are assayed as early as 1 day after the last dose.
dc.language.isoenen
dc.subject.meshAnimals
dc.subject.meshCell Survival
dc.subject.meshColony-Forming Units Assay
dc.subject.meshLiver
dc.subject.meshMale
dc.subject.meshMice
dc.subject.meshRadiation Dosage
dc.subject.meshStem Cells
dc.titleDose fractionation and hepatocyte clonogens: alpha/beta congruent to 1-2 Gy, and beta decreases with increasing delay before assay.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentRadiobiology Department, Paterson Institute for Cancer Research, Christie Hospital and Holt Radium Institute, Manchester, United Kingdom.en
dc.identifier.journalRadiation Researchen
html.description.abstractThe sensitivity to X-ray dose fractionation was assessed for hepatocytes forming colonies in fat pads in mice. When the cells were assayed 1 day after the last irradiation the alpha/beta ratio was 1.0-1.6 depending on the method of analysis. The alpha/beta ratio describing the shape of the single-dose survival curve was much higher, and it did not predict the response to fractionation. When the assay was delayed for 10 months after the fractionated irradiation, the alpha/beta ratio was 1.9-2.1, and the beta component showed the greatest change with time. It is concluded that hepatocytes respond to dose fractionation in a manner expected of a late-responding tissue, even when the cells are assayed as early as 1 day after the last dose.


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