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dc.contributor.authorHamilton, David
dc.contributor.authorCowan, Richard A
dc.contributor.authorSharma, Harbans L
dc.contributor.authorDrayson, M
dc.contributor.authorNuttall, Pamela M
dc.contributor.authorWagstaff, John
dc.contributor.authorDeakin, David P
dc.contributor.authorCrowther, Derek
dc.date.accessioned2010-10-25T11:47:45Z
dc.date.available2010-10-25T11:47:45Z
dc.date.issued1988-04
dc.identifier.citationThe behavior of autologous indium-114m-labeled lymphocytes in patients with lymphoid cell malignancy. 1988, 29 (4):485-93 J. Nucl. Med.en
dc.identifier.issn0161-5505
dc.identifier.pmid3127553
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10541/113748
dc.description.abstractIt has been shown that radioactive material can be localized to lymphocyte traffic areas using radiolabeled autologous lymphocytes and that 114mIn deposited in such a way in rats produces a lymphopoenia by establishing a selective internal irradiation of circulating lymphocytes. The study reported here was undertaken to investigate the feasibility of using this technique in patients with lymphoid cell malignancy. Up to 22.7 MBq was administered to seven patients with active non-Hodgkin's lymphoma involving the spleen and the behavior of the radioactive material was followed over subsequent months. Estimates of the activity in peripheral blood, bone marrow, excreta samples, and of the variation in the whole-body distribution were obtained. The administered radioactive material cleared rapidly from the blood, 85% being removed within the first 30 min. There was an almost immediate uptake of most of this by the spleen and liver with less than 5% of administered activity accumulating in the bone marrow. After 48 hr, the whole-body distribution changed only slowly and there was a regular decrease of the activity in the spleen. Excretion of radioactive material occurred via both the urine and feces and amounted to less than 1% of administered activity per day. This pharmacokinetic data was used to calculate radiation absorbed doses to various organs for a standard man. It is concluded that this represents a feasible technique for the targeting of radioactive material for the treatment of lymphoid malignancy.
dc.language.isoenen
dc.subject.meshAdult
dc.subject.meshAged
dc.subject.meshBlood Cell Count
dc.subject.meshBone Marrow
dc.subject.meshFemale
dc.subject.meshHumans
dc.subject.meshIndium Radioisotopes
dc.subject.meshLymphocytes
dc.subject.meshLymphoma, Non-Hodgkin
dc.subject.meshMale
dc.subject.meshMiddle Aged
dc.subject.meshRadiotherapy Dosage
dc.subject.meshSpleen
dc.subject.meshWhole-Body Counting
dc.titleThe behavior of autologous indium-114m-labeled lymphocytes in patients with lymphoid cell malignancy.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentRegional Department of Medical Physics and Bioengineering, Christie Hospital and Holt Radium Institute, Manchester, England.en
dc.identifier.journalJournal of Nuclear Medicineen
html.description.abstractIt has been shown that radioactive material can be localized to lymphocyte traffic areas using radiolabeled autologous lymphocytes and that 114mIn deposited in such a way in rats produces a lymphopoenia by establishing a selective internal irradiation of circulating lymphocytes. The study reported here was undertaken to investigate the feasibility of using this technique in patients with lymphoid cell malignancy. Up to 22.7 MBq was administered to seven patients with active non-Hodgkin's lymphoma involving the spleen and the behavior of the radioactive material was followed over subsequent months. Estimates of the activity in peripheral blood, bone marrow, excreta samples, and of the variation in the whole-body distribution were obtained. The administered radioactive material cleared rapidly from the blood, 85% being removed within the first 30 min. There was an almost immediate uptake of most of this by the spleen and liver with less than 5% of administered activity accumulating in the bone marrow. After 48 hr, the whole-body distribution changed only slowly and there was a regular decrease of the activity in the spleen. Excretion of radioactive material occurred via both the urine and feces and amounted to less than 1% of administered activity per day. This pharmacokinetic data was used to calculate radiation absorbed doses to various organs for a standard man. It is concluded that this represents a feasible technique for the targeting of radioactive material for the treatment of lymphoid malignancy.


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