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dc.contributor.authorDivecha, Nullin
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-18T08:56:34Z
dc.date.available2010-09-18T08:56:34Z
dc.date.issued2010
dc.identifier.citationMethods to assess changes in the pattern of nuclear phosphoinositides. 2010, 645:165-77 Methods Mol Biolen
dc.identifier.issn1940-6029
dc.identifier.issn1064-3745
dc.identifier.pmid20645188
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/978-1-60327-175-2_11
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10541/111377
dc.description.abstractPhosphatidylinositol (PtdIns) and its phosphorylated derivatives represent less than 5% of total membrane phospholipids in cells. Despite their low abundance, they form a dynamic signalling system that is regulated in response to a variety of extra and intra-cellular cues (Curr Opin Genet Dev 14:196-202, 2004). Phosphoinositides and the enzymes that synthesize them are found in many different sub-cellular compartments including the nuclear matrix, heterochromatin, and sites of active RNA splicing, suggesting that phosphoinositides may regulate specific functions within the nuclear compartment (Nat Rev Mol Cell Biol 4:349-360, 2003; Curr Top Microbiol Immunol 282:177-206, 2004; Cell Mol Life Sci 61:1143-1156, 2004). The existence of distinct sub-cellular pools has led to the challenging task of understanding how the different pools are regulated and how changes in the mass of lipids within the nucleus can modulate nuclear specific pathways. Here we describe methods to determine how enzymatic activities that modulate nuclear phosphoinositides are changed in response to extracellular stimuli.
dc.language.isoenen
dc.subjectPhospholipidsen
dc.subjectCell Signallingen
dc.titleMethods to assess changes in the pattern of nuclear phosphoinositides.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentCRUK Inositide Laboratory, Paterson Institute for Cancer Research, Manchester, UK. ndivecha@picr.man.ac.uken
dc.identifier.journalMethods in Molecular Biologyen
html.description.abstractPhosphatidylinositol (PtdIns) and its phosphorylated derivatives represent less than 5% of total membrane phospholipids in cells. Despite their low abundance, they form a dynamic signalling system that is regulated in response to a variety of extra and intra-cellular cues (Curr Opin Genet Dev 14:196-202, 2004). Phosphoinositides and the enzymes that synthesize them are found in many different sub-cellular compartments including the nuclear matrix, heterochromatin, and sites of active RNA splicing, suggesting that phosphoinositides may regulate specific functions within the nuclear compartment (Nat Rev Mol Cell Biol 4:349-360, 2003; Curr Top Microbiol Immunol 282:177-206, 2004; Cell Mol Life Sci 61:1143-1156, 2004). The existence of distinct sub-cellular pools has led to the challenging task of understanding how the different pools are regulated and how changes in the mass of lipids within the nucleus can modulate nuclear specific pathways. Here we describe methods to determine how enzymatic activities that modulate nuclear phosphoinositides are changed in response to extracellular stimuli.


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