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dc.contributor.authorAddison, John
dc.contributor.authorGlover, Steven W
dc.contributor.authorThornton, Christine
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-14T09:59:59Z
dc.date.available2010-09-14T09:59:59Z
dc.date.issued2010-09
dc.identifier.citationThe impact of information skills training on independent literature searching activity and requests for mediated literature searches. 2010, 27 (3):191-7 Health Info Libr Jen
dc.identifier.issn1471-1842
dc.identifier.pmid20712713
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/j.1471-1842.2009.00871.x
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10541/111141
dc.description.abstractBACKGROUND: Most NHS library services routinely offer both mediated searches and information skills training sessions to their users. We analyse the impact of these two services on the amount of literature searching demonstrated by users of hospital- based library services in the north-west of England. METHODS: Data for (1) mediated literature searches, (2) number of library users attending information skills training sessions, (3) amount of library staff time devoted to information skills training, and (4) number of Athens-authenticated log-ins to databases were obtained from statistical returns for 2007, and analysed for significant correlations. RESULTS: There was evidence of quite strong correlations between the two measures of training activity and the number of mediated literature searches performed by library staff. There was weaker evidence of correlation between training activity and total literature searching activity. DISCUSSION: Attending training sessions may make some library users aware of the difficulty of complex literature searches and actually reduce their confidence to perform their own complex searches independently. The relationships between information skills training, mediated literature searches, and independent literature searching activity remain complex.
dc.language.isoenen
dc.subjectInformation Skills Trainingen
dc.titleThe impact of information skills training on independent literature searching activity and requests for mediated literature searches.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentChristie Hospital NHS Foundation Trust-Kostoris Library, Wilmslow Road, Withington, UK.en
dc.identifier.journalHealth Information and Libraries Journalen
html.description.abstractBACKGROUND: Most NHS library services routinely offer both mediated searches and information skills training sessions to their users. We analyse the impact of these two services on the amount of literature searching demonstrated by users of hospital- based library services in the north-west of England. METHODS: Data for (1) mediated literature searches, (2) number of library users attending information skills training sessions, (3) amount of library staff time devoted to information skills training, and (4) number of Athens-authenticated log-ins to databases were obtained from statistical returns for 2007, and analysed for significant correlations. RESULTS: There was evidence of quite strong correlations between the two measures of training activity and the number of mediated literature searches performed by library staff. There was weaker evidence of correlation between training activity and total literature searching activity. DISCUSSION: Attending training sessions may make some library users aware of the difficulty of complex literature searches and actually reduce their confidence to perform their own complex searches independently. The relationships between information skills training, mediated literature searches, and independent literature searching activity remain complex.


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