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dc.contributor.authorClayton, Peter E
dc.contributor.authorShalet, Stephen M
dc.contributor.authorPrice, David A
dc.contributor.authorJones, P H
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-08T14:45:41Z
dc.date.available2010-09-08T14:45:41Z
dc.date.issued1989
dc.identifier.citationOvarian function following chemotherapy for childhood brain tumours. 1989, 17 (2):92-6 Med. Pediatr. Oncol.en
dc.identifier.issn0098-1532
dc.identifier.pmid2704342
dc.identifier.doi10.1002/mpo.2950170204
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10541/110818
dc.description.abstractPubertal development, basal gonadotrophin, and oestradiol levels were assessed in 21 girls who had received neuroaxis irradiation for a brain tumour followed by adjuvant chemotherapy with carmustine (BCNU) or lomustine (CCNU) and procarbazine. Thirteen received chemotherapy before the age of 11 years. Ten remained prepubertal at their last assessment, nine of whom showed biochemical evidence of primary ovarian failure. The remaining three were pubertal or adult, and although basal follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) and luteinising hormone (LH) levels were normal, all had shown abnormalities of gonadotrophin secretion previously. Eight girls received chemotherapy after 11 years of age. Only three girls exhibited an elevated basal FSH level or exaggerated FSH response to GnRH. Elevated basal FSH values had been noted previously in two of the other five girls. All girls entered or progressed through puberty spontaneously. Seven experienced menarche at an appropriate age. However in four, gonadotrophin levels, which had been elevated, were now within the normal range. In two, menses had continued throughout with normal midfollicular oestradiol levels, whilst the other two developed secondary amenorrhoea associated with radiation-induced gonadotrophin deficiency. The majority of girls showed evidence of primary ovarian dysfunction. This did not prejudice pubertal development or the timing of menarche. Ovarian function may return to normal in the years after treatment, indicating a potential for fertility.
dc.language.isoenen
dc.subjectBrain Canceren
dc.subject.meshAdolescent
dc.subject.meshAntineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols
dc.subject.meshBrain Neoplasms
dc.subject.meshCarmustine
dc.subject.meshChild
dc.subject.meshChild, Preschool
dc.subject.meshFemale
dc.subject.meshHumans
dc.subject.meshLomustine
dc.subject.meshMenarche
dc.subject.meshOvary
dc.subject.meshProcarbazine
dc.subject.meshPuberty
dc.titleOvarian function following chemotherapy for childhood brain tumours.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Child Health, Royal Manchester Children's Hospital, England.en
dc.identifier.journalMedical and Pediatric Oncologyen
html.description.abstractPubertal development, basal gonadotrophin, and oestradiol levels were assessed in 21 girls who had received neuroaxis irradiation for a brain tumour followed by adjuvant chemotherapy with carmustine (BCNU) or lomustine (CCNU) and procarbazine. Thirteen received chemotherapy before the age of 11 years. Ten remained prepubertal at their last assessment, nine of whom showed biochemical evidence of primary ovarian failure. The remaining three were pubertal or adult, and although basal follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) and luteinising hormone (LH) levels were normal, all had shown abnormalities of gonadotrophin secretion previously. Eight girls received chemotherapy after 11 years of age. Only three girls exhibited an elevated basal FSH level or exaggerated FSH response to GnRH. Elevated basal FSH values had been noted previously in two of the other five girls. All girls entered or progressed through puberty spontaneously. Seven experienced menarche at an appropriate age. However in four, gonadotrophin levels, which had been elevated, were now within the normal range. In two, menses had continued throughout with normal midfollicular oestradiol levels, whilst the other two developed secondary amenorrhoea associated with radiation-induced gonadotrophin deficiency. The majority of girls showed evidence of primary ovarian dysfunction. This did not prejudice pubertal development or the timing of menarche. Ovarian function may return to normal in the years after treatment, indicating a potential for fertility.


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