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dc.contributor.authorChang, James
dc.contributor.authorCraft, A W
dc.contributor.authorReid, M M
dc.contributor.authorCoutinho, Lucia H
dc.contributor.authorDexter, T Michael
dc.date.accessioned2010-08-18T15:09:54Z
dc.date.available2010-08-18T15:09:54Z
dc.date.issued1990-10
dc.identifier.citationLack of response of bone marrow, in vitro, to growth factors in congenital neutropenia. 1990, 35 (2):125-6 Am. J. Hematol.en
dc.identifier.issn0361-8609
dc.identifier.pmid1698019
dc.identifier.doi10.1002/ajh.2830350212
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10541/109883
dc.description.abstractSevere congenital neutropenia has a poor outlook. In vitro clonogenic assays using recombinant growth factors may improve understanding of the underlying pathogenetic mechanisms and identify those in whom growth factors might be clinically useful. Marrow from a boy with congenital neutropenia was cultured with a variety of recombinant growth factors. The results show that the neutropenia did not result from a lack of myeloid progenitors but that these progenitors could not produce mature neutrophils. Bone marrow transplantation is being considered as the most likely approach to correct neutropenia.
dc.language.isoenen
dc.subject.meshAgranulocytosis
dc.subject.meshBone Marrow
dc.subject.meshCells, Cultured
dc.subject.meshChild
dc.subject.meshColony-Forming Units Assay
dc.subject.meshColony-Stimulating Factors
dc.subject.meshGranulocyte Colony-Stimulating Factor
dc.subject.meshGranulocyte-Macrophage Colony-Stimulating Factor
dc.subject.meshGrowth Substances
dc.subject.meshHumans
dc.subject.meshInterleukin-3
dc.subject.meshMale
dc.subject.meshNeutropenia
dc.subject.meshRecombinant Proteins
dc.titleLack of response of bone marrow, in vitro, to growth factors in congenital neutropenia.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Haematology, Christie Hospital, Manchester, United Kingdom.en
dc.identifier.journalAmerican Journal of Hematologyen
html.description.abstractSevere congenital neutropenia has a poor outlook. In vitro clonogenic assays using recombinant growth factors may improve understanding of the underlying pathogenetic mechanisms and identify those in whom growth factors might be clinically useful. Marrow from a boy with congenital neutropenia was cultured with a variety of recombinant growth factors. The results show that the neutropenia did not result from a lack of myeloid progenitors but that these progenitors could not produce mature neutrophils. Bone marrow transplantation is being considered as the most likely approach to correct neutropenia.


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