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dc.contributor.authorHeyworth, Clare M
dc.contributor.authorVallance, S J
dc.contributor.authorWhetton, Anthony D
dc.contributor.authorDexter, T Michael
dc.date.accessioned2010-08-18T08:25:36Z
dc.date.available2010-08-18T08:25:36Z
dc.date.issued1990
dc.identifier.citationThe biochemistry and biology of the myeloid haemopoietic cell growth factors. 1990, 13:57-74 J. Cell Sci. Suppl.en
dc.identifier.issn0269-3518
dc.identifier.pmid2084118
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10541/109795
dc.description.abstractIn the adult, blood cell production or haemopoiesis takes place mainly in the bone marrow. The blood cell types produced are a reflection of the needs of the organism at any moment, for example bacterial infection leads to a large increase in neutrophil production. The rate and scale of blood cell production in vivo are regulated, at least in part, by the synthesis and release of specific cytokines both within the bone marrow and also from other tissues. Here we detail the range of cytokines which act directly on haemopoietic stem cells and myeloid progenitor cells. Also cellular systems which will permit the elucidation of the specific interactions between these various cytokines which regulate stem cell self-renewal, differentiation and proliferation are described.
dc.language.isoenen
dc.subjectHaematopoiesisen
dc.subjectHaematopoietic Stem Cellsen
dc.subject.meshAnimals
dc.subject.meshBone Marrow
dc.subject.meshGrowth Substances
dc.subject.meshHematopoiesis
dc.subject.meshHematopoietic Stem Cells
dc.subject.meshHumans
dc.subject.meshInterleukins
dc.titleThe biochemistry and biology of the myeloid haemopoietic cell growth factors.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Experimental Haematology, Paterson Institute for Cancer Research, Christie Hospital and Holt Radium Institute, Manchester, UK.en
dc.identifier.journalJournal of Cell Science. Supplementen
html.description.abstractIn the adult, blood cell production or haemopoiesis takes place mainly in the bone marrow. The blood cell types produced are a reflection of the needs of the organism at any moment, for example bacterial infection leads to a large increase in neutrophil production. The rate and scale of blood cell production in vivo are regulated, at least in part, by the synthesis and release of specific cytokines both within the bone marrow and also from other tissues. Here we detail the range of cytokines which act directly on haemopoietic stem cells and myeloid progenitor cells. Also cellular systems which will permit the elucidation of the specific interactions between these various cytokines which regulate stem cell self-renewal, differentiation and proliferation are described.


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