Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorTurnbull, Jeremy Een
dc.contributor.authorGallagher, John Ten
dc.date.accessioned2010-08-17T11:26:17Z
dc.date.available2010-08-17T11:26:17Z
dc.date.issued1990-02-01
dc.identifier.citationMolecular organization of heparan sulphate from human skin fibroblasts. 1990, 265 (3):715-24 Biochem. J.en
dc.identifier.issn0264-6021
dc.identifier.pmid2137690
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10541/109743
dc.description.abstractThe molecular structure of human skin fibroblast heparan sulphate was examined by specific chemical or enzymic depolymerization and high-resolution separation of the resulting oligosaccharides and disaccharides. Important features of the molecular organization, disaccharide composition and O-sulphate disposition of this heparan sulphate were identified. Analysis of the products of HNO2 hydrolysis revealed a polymer in which 53% of disaccharide units were N-acetylated and 47% N-sulphated, with an N-/O-sulphate ratio of 1.8:1. These two types of disaccharide unit were mainly located in separate domains. Heparitinase and heparinase scission indicated that the iduronate residues (37% of total hexuronate) were largely present in contiguous disaccharide sequences of variable size that also contained the majority of the N-sulphate groups. Most of the iduronate residues (approx. 70%) were non-sulphated. About 8-10% of disaccharide units were cleaved by heparinase, but only a minority of these originated from contiguous sequences in the intact polymer. Trisulphated disaccharide units [alpha-N-sulpho-6-sulphoglucosaminyl-(1----4)-iduronate 2-sulphate], which are the major structural units in heparin, made up only 3% of the disaccharide units in heparan sulphate. O-Sulphate groups (approx. 26 per 100 disaccharide units) were distributed almost evenly among C-6 of N-acetylglucosamine, C-2 of iduronate and C-6 of N-sulphated glucosamine residues. The results indicate that the sulphated regions of heparan sulphate have distinctive and potentially variable structural characteristics. The high content of non-sulphated iduronate in this heparan sulphate species suggests a conformational versatility that could have important implications for the biological properties of the polymer.
dc.language.isoenen
dc.subject.meshCarbohydrate Sequence
dc.subject.meshCells, Cultured
dc.subject.meshChromatography, Gel
dc.subject.meshChromatography, Ion Exchange
dc.subject.meshElectrophoresis, Polyacrylamide Gel
dc.subject.meshFibroblasts
dc.subject.meshGlycosaminoglycans
dc.subject.meshHeparitin Sulfate
dc.subject.meshHumans
dc.subject.meshMolecular Sequence Data
dc.subject.meshMolecular Structure
dc.subject.meshOligosaccharides
dc.subject.meshSkin
dc.titleMolecular organization of heparan sulphate from human skin fibroblasts.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Clinical Research, University of Manchester, Christie Hospital and Holt Radium Institute, U.K.en
dc.identifier.journalBiochemical Journalen
html.description.abstractThe molecular structure of human skin fibroblast heparan sulphate was examined by specific chemical or enzymic depolymerization and high-resolution separation of the resulting oligosaccharides and disaccharides. Important features of the molecular organization, disaccharide composition and O-sulphate disposition of this heparan sulphate were identified. Analysis of the products of HNO2 hydrolysis revealed a polymer in which 53% of disaccharide units were N-acetylated and 47% N-sulphated, with an N-/O-sulphate ratio of 1.8:1. These two types of disaccharide unit were mainly located in separate domains. Heparitinase and heparinase scission indicated that the iduronate residues (37% of total hexuronate) were largely present in contiguous disaccharide sequences of variable size that also contained the majority of the N-sulphate groups. Most of the iduronate residues (approx. 70%) were non-sulphated. About 8-10% of disaccharide units were cleaved by heparinase, but only a minority of these originated from contiguous sequences in the intact polymer. Trisulphated disaccharide units [alpha-N-sulpho-6-sulphoglucosaminyl-(1----4)-iduronate 2-sulphate], which are the major structural units in heparin, made up only 3% of the disaccharide units in heparan sulphate. O-Sulphate groups (approx. 26 per 100 disaccharide units) were distributed almost evenly among C-6 of N-acetylglucosamine, C-2 of iduronate and C-6 of N-sulphated glucosamine residues. The results indicate that the sulphated regions of heparan sulphate have distinctive and potentially variable structural characteristics. The high content of non-sulphated iduronate in this heparan sulphate species suggests a conformational versatility that could have important implications for the biological properties of the polymer.


This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record