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dc.contributor.authorDavidson, Susan Een
dc.contributor.authorWest, Catharine M Len
dc.contributor.authorHunter, Robin Den
dc.date.accessioned2010-08-16T14:22:15Z
dc.date.available2010-08-16T14:22:15Z
dc.date.issued1992-01-02
dc.identifier.citationLack of association between in vitro clonogenic growth of human cervical carcinoma and tumour stage, differentiation, patient age, host cell infiltration or patient survival. 1992, 50 (1):10-4 Int. J. Canceren
dc.identifier.issn0020-7136
dc.identifier.pmid1728599
dc.identifier.doi10.1002/ijc.2910500104
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10541/109653
dc.description.abstractBiopsies from 117 patients with cervical carcinoma were studied using a clonogenic assay to assess in vitro growth. Successful colony growth was achieved in 84 tumours (72%) with a mean colony-forming efficiency (CFE), based on total viable nucleated cell counts, of 0.18 +/- 0.49% (+/- 1 standard deviation). There was a wide range of values, from 0.003-4.28%, with a coefficient of variation of 272%. The relationship between clinical features of cervical carcinoma and in vitro colony formation was investigated. No significant association was demonstrated between in vitro growth and either clinical stage (r = 0.02), tumour differentiation (r = -0.08) or patient age (r = -0.12). There was no significant difference in tumour grade between the group of tumours which failed to grow in culture and those which grew well (p = 0.70). In addition, there was no correlation between CFE and the degree of macrophage (r = 0.001), lymphocyte (r = 0.12), or granulocyte (r = 0.08) infiltration. There was no significant difference between CFEs of tumours from patients who had died and from those who were alive and well after a minimum of 2 years' follow-up after radiotherapy (p = 0.51). Ability to form colonies in agar was not associated with a worse prognosis (p = 0.49). Although CFE is an independent biological parameter, our results suggest that, for cervical carcinoma, it is not useful as a univariate prognostic factor.
dc.language.isoenen
dc.subjectUterine Cervical Canceren
dc.subject.meshAdenocarcinoma
dc.subject.meshAge Factors
dc.subject.meshCarcinoma, Squamous Cell
dc.subject.meshCell Differentiation
dc.subject.meshClone Cells
dc.subject.meshFemale
dc.subject.meshHumans
dc.subject.meshSurvival Analysis
dc.subject.meshUterine Cervical Neoplasms
dc.titleLack of association between in vitro clonogenic growth of human cervical carcinoma and tumour stage, differentiation, patient age, host cell infiltration or patient survival.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentCancer Research Campaign Department of Experimental Radiation Oncology, Paterson Institute for Cancer Research, Manchester, UK.en
dc.identifier.journalInternational Journal of Canceren
html.description.abstractBiopsies from 117 patients with cervical carcinoma were studied using a clonogenic assay to assess in vitro growth. Successful colony growth was achieved in 84 tumours (72%) with a mean colony-forming efficiency (CFE), based on total viable nucleated cell counts, of 0.18 +/- 0.49% (+/- 1 standard deviation). There was a wide range of values, from 0.003-4.28%, with a coefficient of variation of 272%. The relationship between clinical features of cervical carcinoma and in vitro colony formation was investigated. No significant association was demonstrated between in vitro growth and either clinical stage (r = 0.02), tumour differentiation (r = -0.08) or patient age (r = -0.12). There was no significant difference in tumour grade between the group of tumours which failed to grow in culture and those which grew well (p = 0.70). In addition, there was no correlation between CFE and the degree of macrophage (r = 0.001), lymphocyte (r = 0.12), or granulocyte (r = 0.08) infiltration. There was no significant difference between CFEs of tumours from patients who had died and from those who were alive and well after a minimum of 2 years' follow-up after radiotherapy (p = 0.51). Ability to form colonies in agar was not associated with a worse prognosis (p = 0.49). Although CFE is an independent biological parameter, our results suggest that, for cervical carcinoma, it is not useful as a univariate prognostic factor.


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