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dc.contributor.authorHowell, Anthony
dc.contributor.authorDodwell, David J
dc.contributor.authorAnderson, Heather
dc.contributor.authorRedford, J
dc.date.accessioned2010-08-11T17:09:26Z
dc.date.available2010-08-11T17:09:26Z
dc.date.issued1992-09
dc.identifier.citationResponse after withdrawal of tamoxifen and progestogens in advanced breast cancer. 1992, 3 (8):611-7 Ann Oncolen
dc.identifier.issn0923-7534
dc.identifier.pmid1450042
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10541/109506
dc.description.abstractTumor response after withdrawal of endocrine therapy for advanced breast cancer with estrogens and androgens is well described. There have been few reports of withdrawal responses (WRs) after cessation of treatment with the newer antiestrogens and progestogens. We assessed WR in women after cessation of adjuvant therapy at first relapse, and after progression on first, second or third line endocrine therapy for advanced disease. One of seven patients (14%) responded after cessation of tamoxifen adjuvant therapy at relapse. Sixty-five of 72 patients were evaluable for WR after cessation of tamoxifen as first line therapy for advanced disease. There were five partial responses (8%) and 14 (22%) 'no change' with a median duration of WR of 10 months (range 3-40 months). WR were seen mainly in soft tissue disease but there were two responses in lung and two in bone. Four of 21 (19%) patients had a WR after cessation of norethisterone acetate (3) and tamoxifen (1), all used as second line therapy. WR are therefore demonstrable after cessation of tamoxifen and norethisterone acetate with durations of response similar to those found with additive therapy. Assessment of WR may represent a way of prolonging the overall response duration in patients with relatively indolent metastatic breast cancer, particularly in soft tissues.
dc.language.isoenen
dc.subjectBreast Canceren
dc.subject.meshAdult
dc.subject.meshAged
dc.subject.meshAged, 80 and over
dc.subject.meshBreast Neoplasms
dc.subject.meshFemale
dc.subject.meshHumans
dc.subject.meshMiddle Aged
dc.subject.meshProgestins
dc.subject.meshSubstance Withdrawal Syndrome
dc.subject.meshTamoxifen
dc.titleResponse after withdrawal of tamoxifen and progestogens in advanced breast cancer.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentCRC Department of Medical Oncology, Christie Hospital, Manchester.en
dc.identifier.journalAnnals of Oncologyen
html.description.abstractTumor response after withdrawal of endocrine therapy for advanced breast cancer with estrogens and androgens is well described. There have been few reports of withdrawal responses (WRs) after cessation of treatment with the newer antiestrogens and progestogens. We assessed WR in women after cessation of adjuvant therapy at first relapse, and after progression on first, second or third line endocrine therapy for advanced disease. One of seven patients (14%) responded after cessation of tamoxifen adjuvant therapy at relapse. Sixty-five of 72 patients were evaluable for WR after cessation of tamoxifen as first line therapy for advanced disease. There were five partial responses (8%) and 14 (22%) 'no change' with a median duration of WR of 10 months (range 3-40 months). WR were seen mainly in soft tissue disease but there were two responses in lung and two in bone. Four of 21 (19%) patients had a WR after cessation of norethisterone acetate (3) and tamoxifen (1), all used as second line therapy. WR are therefore demonstrable after cessation of tamoxifen and norethisterone acetate with durations of response similar to those found with additive therapy. Assessment of WR may represent a way of prolonging the overall response duration in patients with relatively indolent metastatic breast cancer, particularly in soft tissues.


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