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dc.contributor.authorVuckovic, Men
dc.contributor.authorGenbacev, Oen
dc.contributor.authorKumar, Shanten
dc.date.accessioned2010-08-11T15:40:56Z
dc.date.available2010-08-11T15:40:56Z
dc.date.issued1992
dc.identifier.citationImmunohistochemical localisation of transforming growth factor-beta in first and third trimester human placenta. 1992, 60 (3):149-51 Pathobiologyen
dc.identifier.issn1015-2008
dc.identifier.pmid1627260
dc.identifier.doi10.1159/000163714
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10541/109489
dc.description.abstractRecently it has been demonstrated that human placental tissue is a source of transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta) and that it expresses high TGF-beta mRNA activity. For a better understanding of its in vivo function, it was necessary to determine the site of TGF-beta synthesis in placenta. We have demonstrated that TGF-beta immunoreactivity is present in the cytoplasm of syncytiotrophoblast cells in both early and term placenta. The most intense staining was, however, observed in the first trimester trophoblast syncytial sprouts known to be an early stage in the development of placental villi. These results suggest the involvement of TGF-beta in the paracrine regulation of trophoblast-endometrial interaction.
dc.language.isoenen
dc.subject.meshChorionic Villi
dc.subject.meshCytoplasm
dc.subject.meshFemale
dc.subject.meshHumans
dc.subject.meshImmunoenzyme Techniques
dc.subject.meshPlacenta
dc.subject.meshPregnancy
dc.subject.meshPregnancy Proteins
dc.subject.meshPregnancy Trimester, First
dc.subject.meshPregnancy Trimester, Third
dc.subject.meshTransforming Growth Factor beta
dc.subject.meshTrophoblasts
dc.titleImmunohistochemical localisation of transforming growth factor-beta in first and third trimester human placenta.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentInstitute of Endocrinology, Immunology and Nutrition, INEPT, Semun, Yugoslavia.en
dc.identifier.journalPathobiologyen
html.description.abstractRecently it has been demonstrated that human placental tissue is a source of transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta) and that it expresses high TGF-beta mRNA activity. For a better understanding of its in vivo function, it was necessary to determine the site of TGF-beta synthesis in placenta. We have demonstrated that TGF-beta immunoreactivity is present in the cytoplasm of syncytiotrophoblast cells in both early and term placenta. The most intense staining was, however, observed in the first trimester trophoblast syncytial sprouts known to be an early stage in the development of placental villi. These results suggest the involvement of TGF-beta in the paracrine regulation of trophoblast-endometrial interaction.


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