Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorWojcieszek, Een
dc.contributor.authorRembielak, Agataen
dc.contributor.authorBialas, Ben
dc.contributor.authorWojcieszek, Aen
dc.date.accessioned2010-08-11T10:50:09Z
dc.date.available2010-08-11T10:50:09Z
dc.date.issued2010
dc.identifier.citationAnaesthesia for radiation therapy - Gliwice experience. 2010, 57 (2):155-60 Neoplasmaen
dc.identifier.issn0028-2685
dc.identifier.pmid20099980
dc.identifier.doi10.4149/neo_2010_02_155
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10541/109477
dc.description.abstractGeneral anaesthesia is rarely applied during fractionated radiotherapy with the exception of unco-operative patients. We performed a retrospective study to inform our current practice in anaesthesia procedures for radiotherapy application in children, brachytherapy and intraoperative radiation. The records of anaesthetized radiotherapy patients between January 2000 and September 2005 were analyzed. We analysed demographic data, type and localisation of neoplasm , radiotherapy data, type of anaesthesia and anaesthesia - related complications. In order to provide safe and efficient anaesthesia outside the Department of Anaesthesiology, we designed a mobile anaesthesia workstation. In total we performed 739 anaesthesia procedures: 267 in 16 children, 321 in 284 brachytherapy patients, and 151 as a part of intraoperative radiotherapy. Children age ranged from 2 - 8 years (median 4.6). All were given midazolam and atropine, then thiopental or ketamine. Neither muscle relaxants, nor propofol were used. Brachytherapy patients underwent: spinal block in 190 cases, general anaesthesia in 115, and deep sedation in 16 cases. General anaesthesia was inducted by propofol, followed by etomidate, thiopental and fentanyl. For spinal block the patients were given hyperbaric bupivacaine and fentanyl. Deep sedation was performed with midazolam and fentanyl, and thiopental or propofol when needed. Intraoperative radiotherapy was applied immediately after breast conserving surgery. No serious complications in all 739 anaesthesia procedures occurred. In conclusion we demonstrated the feasibility and safety of anaesthesia applied in our radiotherapy patients. The custom designed mobile anaesthesia workstation allowed us to provide safe and efficient anaesthesia in any place outside the Department of Anaesthesiology.
dc.language.isoenen
dc.subjectCanceren
dc.subject.meshAnesthesia, General
dc.subject.meshAnesthesia, Spinal
dc.subject.meshAnesthetics
dc.subject.meshBrachytherapy
dc.subject.meshChild
dc.subject.meshChild, Preschool
dc.subject.meshDeep Sedation
dc.subject.meshFeasibility Studies
dc.subject.meshFemale
dc.subject.meshHumans
dc.subject.meshMale
dc.subject.meshNeoplasms
dc.subject.meshPhysician's Practice Patterns
dc.subject.meshRetrospective Studies
dc.subject.meshSafety
dc.titleAnaesthesia for radiation therapy - Gliwice experience.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Anaesthesia and Intensive Care, Centre of Oncology - MSC Institute, Gliwice, Poland.en
dc.identifier.journalNeoplasmaen
html.description.abstractGeneral anaesthesia is rarely applied during fractionated radiotherapy with the exception of unco-operative patients. We performed a retrospective study to inform our current practice in anaesthesia procedures for radiotherapy application in children, brachytherapy and intraoperative radiation. The records of anaesthetized radiotherapy patients between January 2000 and September 2005 were analyzed. We analysed demographic data, type and localisation of neoplasm , radiotherapy data, type of anaesthesia and anaesthesia - related complications. In order to provide safe and efficient anaesthesia outside the Department of Anaesthesiology, we designed a mobile anaesthesia workstation. In total we performed 739 anaesthesia procedures: 267 in 16 children, 321 in 284 brachytherapy patients, and 151 as a part of intraoperative radiotherapy. Children age ranged from 2 - 8 years (median 4.6). All were given midazolam and atropine, then thiopental or ketamine. Neither muscle relaxants, nor propofol were used. Brachytherapy patients underwent: spinal block in 190 cases, general anaesthesia in 115, and deep sedation in 16 cases. General anaesthesia was inducted by propofol, followed by etomidate, thiopental and fentanyl. For spinal block the patients were given hyperbaric bupivacaine and fentanyl. Deep sedation was performed with midazolam and fentanyl, and thiopental or propofol when needed. Intraoperative radiotherapy was applied immediately after breast conserving surgery. No serious complications in all 739 anaesthesia procedures occurred. In conclusion we demonstrated the feasibility and safety of anaesthesia applied in our radiotherapy patients. The custom designed mobile anaesthesia workstation allowed us to provide safe and efficient anaesthesia in any place outside the Department of Anaesthesiology.


This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record