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dc.contributor.authorTesta, Nydia Gen
dc.contributor.authorDexter, T Michaelen
dc.date.accessioned2010-08-04T10:04:58Z
dc.date.available2010-08-04T10:04:58Z
dc.date.issued1992-12
dc.identifier.citationColony-stimulating factors in the clinic. 1992, 3 (6):687-92 Curr. Opin. Biotechnol.en
dc.identifier.issn0958-1669
dc.identifier.pmid1283087
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/0958-1669(92)90017-D
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10541/109032
dc.description.abstractRecombinant purified human haemopoietic growth factors are available for clinical trials and some have been licensed for therapeutic use. Some haemopoietic lineages (erythroid, neutrophilic, monocyte-macrophagic) can be selectively stimulated in order to ameliorate the cytopenias that follow cytotoxic treatment, or that characterize some haematological syndromes, and to stimulate mature cell function. Advances in the knowledge of receptor-ligand interactions and of transduction mechanisms, plus the production of synthetic or mutant molecules that may mimic, potentiate or antagonize the effects of the natural growth factors, should make novel therapeutic approaches possible.
dc.language.isoenen
dc.subjectCanceren
dc.subject.meshAnimals
dc.subject.meshAntineoplastic Agents
dc.subject.meshColony-Stimulating Factors
dc.subject.meshGranulocyte Colony-Stimulating Factor
dc.subject.meshGranulocyte-Macrophage Colony-Stimulating Factor
dc.subject.meshGrowth Substances
dc.subject.meshHumans
dc.subject.meshNeoplasms
dc.subject.meshNeutropenia
dc.subject.meshRecombinant Proteins
dc.titleColony-stimulating factors in the clinic.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentCancer Research Campaign Department of Experimental Haematology, Paterson Institute for Cancer Research, Christie Hospital, Manchester, UK.en
dc.identifier.journalCurrent Opinion in Biotechnologyen
html.description.abstractRecombinant purified human haemopoietic growth factors are available for clinical trials and some have been licensed for therapeutic use. Some haemopoietic lineages (erythroid, neutrophilic, monocyte-macrophagic) can be selectively stimulated in order to ameliorate the cytopenias that follow cytotoxic treatment, or that characterize some haematological syndromes, and to stimulate mature cell function. Advances in the knowledge of receptor-ligand interactions and of transduction mechanisms, plus the production of synthetic or mutant molecules that may mimic, potentiate or antagonize the effects of the natural growth factors, should make novel therapeutic approaches possible.


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