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dc.contributor.authorHopwood, Penelope
dc.contributor.authorThatcher, Nick
dc.date.accessioned2010-07-14T16:19:19Z
dc.date.available2010-07-14T16:19:19Z
dc.date.issued1990-05
dc.identifier.citationPreliminary experience with quality of life evaluation in patients with lung cancer. 1990, 4 (5):158-62; discussion 171 Oncologyen
dc.identifier.issn0890-9091
dc.identifier.pmid2166550
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10541/107650
dc.description.abstractEvaluating quality of life in patients receiving treatment for cancer has been an increasing concern, particularly when a cure may not be possible. Such measurements inform clinicians and investigators of the relative costs and benefits of palliative treatments, and are potentially important when there is little or no difference between drug regimens in terms of tumor response or survival. Where it is felt intuitively by oncologists that a particular mode or frequency of therapy may be superior to existing regimens, quality of life data may inform us differently, and there is a case to be made for incorporating such evaluations in clinical trials. In parallel to the experience of other groups, we have developed experience with certain scales, focusing on evaluations of lung cancer patients. This process enabled us to prospectively include and implement quality of life studies into our clinical trials.
dc.language.isoenen
dc.subjectLung Canceren
dc.subject.meshCarcinoma, Non-Small-Cell Lung
dc.subject.meshEvaluation Studies as Topic
dc.subject.meshFemale
dc.subject.meshHumans
dc.subject.meshLung Neoplasms
dc.subject.meshMale
dc.subject.meshPsychological Tests
dc.subject.meshQuality of Life
dc.titlePreliminary experience with quality of life evaluation in patients with lung cancer.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentChristie Hospital and Holt Radium Institute, Manchester, UK.en
dc.identifier.journalOncologyen
html.description.abstractEvaluating quality of life in patients receiving treatment for cancer has been an increasing concern, particularly when a cure may not be possible. Such measurements inform clinicians and investigators of the relative costs and benefits of palliative treatments, and are potentially important when there is little or no difference between drug regimens in terms of tumor response or survival. Where it is felt intuitively by oncologists that a particular mode or frequency of therapy may be superior to existing regimens, quality of life data may inform us differently, and there is a case to be made for incorporating such evaluations in clinical trials. In parallel to the experience of other groups, we have developed experience with certain scales, focusing on evaluations of lung cancer patients. This process enabled us to prospectively include and implement quality of life studies into our clinical trials.


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