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dc.contributor.authorWheatley-Price, P
dc.contributor.authorMa, C
dc.contributor.authorAshcroft, Linda
dc.contributor.authorNankivell, M
dc.contributor.authorStephens, R J
dc.contributor.authorWhite, Shane C
dc.contributor.authorLorigan, Paul C
dc.contributor.authorThatcher, Nick
dc.contributor.authorBlackhall, Fiona H
dc.contributor.authorShepherd, F A
dc.date.accessioned2010-07-13T09:08:13Z
dc.date.available2010-07-13T09:08:13Z
dc.date.issued2010-02
dc.identifier.citationThe strength of female sex as a prognostic factor in small-cell lung cancer: a pooled analysis of chemotherapy trials from the Manchester Lung Group and Medical Research Council Clinical Trials Unit. 2010, 21 (2):232-7 Ann Oncolen
dc.identifier.issn1569-8041
dc.identifier.pmid19675093
dc.identifier.doi10.1093/annonc/mdp300
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10541/107553
dc.description.abstractBACKGROUND: Previous studies reported that women survive longer than men, but experience greater toxicity, when treated for small-cell lung cancer (SCLC). METHODS: Individual patient data from six randomized phase II/III chemotherapy trials, from the Manchester Lung Group and UK Medical Research Council, were pooled for analysis. End points included overall survival, response rate, toxicity, dose intensity (DI) and transfusion rates. RESULTS: Of 1707 patients analyzed, 44% were women. At baseline, women had poorer performance status (PS) (57% versus 67% Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group PS 0-1/Karnofsky PS 80-100, P = 0.0004) and more were of normal weight or underweight (57% versus 48%, P = 0.003), but fewer were anemic (25% versus 62%, P < 0.0001). Response rates between women and men were similar (77% versus 76%, P = 0.64). In univariate [hazard ratio (HR) 0.85, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.76-0.96, P = 0.006] and multivariate (HR 0.88, 95% CI 0.79-0.99, P = 0.04) analyses, female sex predicted for longer survival. Women experienced more grade 3/4 emesis (18% versus 9%, P < 0.0001) and grade 3/4 mucositis (13% versus 8%, P = 0.005) than men. There were no differences in DI, infections, transfusions or treatment-related deaths. CONCLUSION: Data from >1700 patients in randomized SCLC chemotherapy trials confirm that women survive modestly longer than men but may experience greater toxicity.
dc.language.isoenen
dc.subjectLung Canceren
dc.subject.meshAdult
dc.subject.meshAged
dc.subject.meshAged, 80 and over
dc.subject.meshAntineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols
dc.subject.meshClinical Trials as Topic
dc.subject.meshFemale
dc.subject.meshGreat Britain
dc.subject.meshHumans
dc.subject.meshLung Neoplasms
dc.subject.meshMale
dc.subject.meshMiddle Aged
dc.subject.meshPrognosis
dc.subject.meshSex Factors
dc.subject.meshSmall Cell Lung Carcinoma
dc.subject.meshSocieties, Medical
dc.subject.meshSurvival Analysis
dc.subject.meshTreatment Outcome
dc.titleThe strength of female sex as a prognostic factor in small-cell lung cancer: a pooled analysis of chemotherapy trials from the Manchester Lung Group and Medical Research Council Clinical Trials Unit.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Medical Oncology, Princess Margaret Hospital/University Health Network, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario. paulwp@doctors.org.uken
dc.identifier.journalAnnals of Oncologyen
html.description.abstractBACKGROUND: Previous studies reported that women survive longer than men, but experience greater toxicity, when treated for small-cell lung cancer (SCLC). METHODS: Individual patient data from six randomized phase II/III chemotherapy trials, from the Manchester Lung Group and UK Medical Research Council, were pooled for analysis. End points included overall survival, response rate, toxicity, dose intensity (DI) and transfusion rates. RESULTS: Of 1707 patients analyzed, 44% were women. At baseline, women had poorer performance status (PS) (57% versus 67% Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group PS 0-1/Karnofsky PS 80-100, P = 0.0004) and more were of normal weight or underweight (57% versus 48%, P = 0.003), but fewer were anemic (25% versus 62%, P < 0.0001). Response rates between women and men were similar (77% versus 76%, P = 0.64). In univariate [hazard ratio (HR) 0.85, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.76-0.96, P = 0.006] and multivariate (HR 0.88, 95% CI 0.79-0.99, P = 0.04) analyses, female sex predicted for longer survival. Women experienced more grade 3/4 emesis (18% versus 9%, P < 0.0001) and grade 3/4 mucositis (13% versus 8%, P = 0.005) than men. There were no differences in DI, infections, transfusions or treatment-related deaths. CONCLUSION: Data from >1700 patients in randomized SCLC chemotherapy trials confirm that women survive modestly longer than men but may experience greater toxicity.


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