Factors affecting the radiation dose to the lens of the eye during cardiac catheterization procedures.

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10541/99761
Title:
Factors affecting the radiation dose to the lens of the eye during cardiac catheterization procedures.
Authors:
Pratt, T A; Shaw, A J
Abstract:
Concern has been expressed about the relatively high radiation doses to the lens of the eye received by the operator during cardiac catheterization studies. A study was undertaken to assess the occupational doses received by cardiologists and to examine the factors that affect the individual's eye dose. Eighteen cardiologists working in five catheterization laboratories at three centres were included in the study. Their eye doses, workload and individual study details were monitored at each centre. Operating dose rates and scattered radiation were also measured for each unit to compare equipment performance. The study demonstrated that the relationships between the cardiologist's eye dose and factors such as the dose efficiency of the X-ray equipment, scattered dose rates, examination protocols and workload are complex and vary from centre to centre. Because of these variations general workload limits may be inaccurate and should only be used for general guidance when no direct measurements are available. Such limits should be verified by local measurements as soon as is practical.
Affiliation:
North Western Medical Physics Department, Christie Hospital, Withington, Manchester, UK.
Citation:
Factors affecting the radiation dose to the lens of the eye during cardiac catheterization procedures. 1993, 66 (784):346-50 Br J Radiol
Journal:
The British Journal of Radiology
Issue Date:
Apr-1993
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10541/99761
DOI:
10.1259/0007-1285-66-784-346
PubMed ID:
8495289
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
0007-1285
Appears in Collections:
All Christie Publications

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorPratt, T Aen
dc.contributor.authorShaw, A Jen
dc.date.accessioned2010-05-24T15:32:05Z-
dc.date.available2010-05-24T15:32:05Z-
dc.date.issued1993-04-
dc.identifier.citationFactors affecting the radiation dose to the lens of the eye during cardiac catheterization procedures. 1993, 66 (784):346-50 Br J Radiolen
dc.identifier.issn0007-1285-
dc.identifier.pmid8495289-
dc.identifier.doi10.1259/0007-1285-66-784-346-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10541/99761-
dc.description.abstractConcern has been expressed about the relatively high radiation doses to the lens of the eye received by the operator during cardiac catheterization studies. A study was undertaken to assess the occupational doses received by cardiologists and to examine the factors that affect the individual's eye dose. Eighteen cardiologists working in five catheterization laboratories at three centres were included in the study. Their eye doses, workload and individual study details were monitored at each centre. Operating dose rates and scattered radiation were also measured for each unit to compare equipment performance. The study demonstrated that the relationships between the cardiologist's eye dose and factors such as the dose efficiency of the X-ray equipment, scattered dose rates, examination protocols and workload are complex and vary from centre to centre. Because of these variations general workload limits may be inaccurate and should only be used for general guidance when no direct measurements are available. Such limits should be verified by local measurements as soon as is practical.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.subject.meshCardiology-
dc.subject.meshHeart Catheterization-
dc.subject.meshHumans-
dc.subject.meshLens, Crystalline-
dc.subject.meshOccupational Exposure-
dc.subject.meshRadiation Dosage-
dc.subject.meshScattering, Radiation-
dc.subject.meshWorkload-
dc.titleFactors affecting the radiation dose to the lens of the eye during cardiac catheterization procedures.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentNorth Western Medical Physics Department, Christie Hospital, Withington, Manchester, UK.en
dc.identifier.journalThe British Journal of Radiologyen

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