2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10541/99444
Title:
Biology of blood progenitor cells used in transplantation.
Authors:
Pettengell, Ruth; Testa, Nydia G
Abstract:
Blood progenitor cells (BPC) are increasingly used in a variety of clinical settings. These include autologous and allogeneic transplantation after myeloablative therapy, and gene therapy. The optimal blood products for each of these applications have not been defined. The use of different cytotoxic drugs and cytokines, alone and in combination, results in the mobilisation of different total numbers and relative proportions of primitive and committed BPC. Some cytotoxics and cytokines not only are poor at mobilising BPC, but also are myelotoxic. Here we review the biology of BPC mobilisation and its implications for their clinical use.
Affiliation:
CRC Department of Medical Oncology, Christie Hospital, Manchester, UK.
Citation:
Biology of blood progenitor cells used in transplantation. 1995, 61 (1):1-15 Int. J. Hematol.
Journal:
International Journal of Hematology
Issue Date:
Jan-1995
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10541/99444
PubMed ID:
7718764
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
0925-5710
Appears in Collections:
All Christie Publications ; All Paterson Institute for Cancer Research

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorPettengell, Ruthen
dc.contributor.authorTesta, Nydia Gen
dc.date.accessioned2010-05-20T15:23:52Z-
dc.date.available2010-05-20T15:23:52Z-
dc.date.issued1995-01-
dc.identifier.citationBiology of blood progenitor cells used in transplantation. 1995, 61 (1):1-15 Int. J. Hematol.en
dc.identifier.issn0925-5710-
dc.identifier.pmid7718764-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10541/99444-
dc.description.abstractBlood progenitor cells (BPC) are increasingly used in a variety of clinical settings. These include autologous and allogeneic transplantation after myeloablative therapy, and gene therapy. The optimal blood products for each of these applications have not been defined. The use of different cytotoxic drugs and cytokines, alone and in combination, results in the mobilisation of different total numbers and relative proportions of primitive and committed BPC. Some cytotoxics and cytokines not only are poor at mobilising BPC, but also are myelotoxic. Here we review the biology of BPC mobilisation and its implications for their clinical use.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.subjectHaematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantationen
dc.subject.meshAntineoplastic Agents-
dc.subject.meshCytokines-
dc.subject.meshHematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation-
dc.subject.meshHumans-
dc.titleBiology of blood progenitor cells used in transplantation.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentCRC Department of Medical Oncology, Christie Hospital, Manchester, UK.en
dc.identifier.journalInternational Journal of Hematologyen
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