Urinary tract obstruction and nephrostomy drainage in pelvic malignant disease.

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10541/99114
Title:
Urinary tract obstruction and nephrostomy drainage in pelvic malignant disease.
Authors:
Lau, M W; Temperley, D E; Mehta, S; Johnson, Richard J; Barnard, R J; Clarke, Noel W ( 0000-0001-7776-8059 )
Abstract:
OBJECTIVE: To determine the survival of patients after percutaneous nephrostomy drainage (PND) for obstructive uropathy secondary to pelvic malignant disease. PATIENTS AND METHODS: The records of 77 patients undergoing PND for obstructive uropathy were reviewed. Patients were classified according to the nature of the obstructing lesion: Group I (primary untreated malignancy, 31 patients); Group II (recurrent malignancy with further treatment, 15 patients); Group III (recurrent malignancy with no further treatment, 12 patients); and Group IV (benign disease as a consequence of previous treatment, 19 patients). Outcome was assessed by survival over a mean follow-up of 20 months (range 2 days-8.3 years). RESULTS: Overall median survival was 26 weeks, with a 5-year survival of 22%. The survival in Groups I and II was not significantly different (median survival 27 and 20 weeks, respectively; 5-year survival, 10% and 20%, respectively). Group III patients had a poor prognosis (median survival 6.5 weeks) with no patient surviving beyond one year, whilst Group IV patients fared best with a 5-year survival of 64%. The commonest primary tumour type was carcinoma of the cervix (42 patients), and these patients were analysed as a subset. Benign post-radiation fibrosis was found in 16 of 27 patients (59%). Survival was related to the diagnostic group. CONCLUSION: The nature and extent of the obstructing lesion and its potential for further treatment are the major determinants of post-nephrostomy survival. Every effort should therefore be made to identify the nature of the obstruction before deciding on PND.
Affiliation:
Department of Urology, Christie Hospital NHS Trust, Withington, Manchester, UK.
Citation:
Urinary tract obstruction and nephrostomy drainage in pelvic malignant disease. 1995, 76 (5):565-9 Br J Urol
Journal:
British Journal of Urology
Issue Date:
Nov-1995
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10541/99114
DOI:
10.1111/j.1464-410X.1995.tb07779
PubMed ID:
8535673
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
0007-1331
Appears in Collections:
All Christie Publications

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorLau, M Wen
dc.contributor.authorTemperley, D Een
dc.contributor.authorMehta, Sen
dc.contributor.authorJohnson, Richard Jen
dc.contributor.authorBarnard, R Jen
dc.contributor.authorClarke, Noel Wen
dc.date.accessioned2010-05-18T12:40:01Z-
dc.date.available2010-05-18T12:40:01Z-
dc.date.issued1995-11-
dc.identifier.citationUrinary tract obstruction and nephrostomy drainage in pelvic malignant disease. 1995, 76 (5):565-9 Br J Urolen
dc.identifier.issn0007-1331-
dc.identifier.pmid8535673-
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/j.1464-410X.1995.tb07779-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10541/99114-
dc.description.abstractOBJECTIVE: To determine the survival of patients after percutaneous nephrostomy drainage (PND) for obstructive uropathy secondary to pelvic malignant disease. PATIENTS AND METHODS: The records of 77 patients undergoing PND for obstructive uropathy were reviewed. Patients were classified according to the nature of the obstructing lesion: Group I (primary untreated malignancy, 31 patients); Group II (recurrent malignancy with further treatment, 15 patients); Group III (recurrent malignancy with no further treatment, 12 patients); and Group IV (benign disease as a consequence of previous treatment, 19 patients). Outcome was assessed by survival over a mean follow-up of 20 months (range 2 days-8.3 years). RESULTS: Overall median survival was 26 weeks, with a 5-year survival of 22%. The survival in Groups I and II was not significantly different (median survival 27 and 20 weeks, respectively; 5-year survival, 10% and 20%, respectively). Group III patients had a poor prognosis (median survival 6.5 weeks) with no patient surviving beyond one year, whilst Group IV patients fared best with a 5-year survival of 64%. The commonest primary tumour type was carcinoma of the cervix (42 patients), and these patients were analysed as a subset. Benign post-radiation fibrosis was found in 16 of 27 patients (59%). Survival was related to the diagnostic group. CONCLUSION: The nature and extent of the obstructing lesion and its potential for further treatment are the major determinants of post-nephrostomy survival. Every effort should therefore be made to identify the nature of the obstruction before deciding on PND.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.subjectCancer Recurrenceen
dc.subjectPelvic Canceren
dc.subjectUterine Cervical Canceren
dc.subject.meshAdult-
dc.subject.meshAged-
dc.subject.meshFemale-
dc.subject.meshFollow-Up Studies-
dc.subject.meshHumans-
dc.subject.meshMale-
dc.subject.meshMiddle Aged-
dc.subject.meshNeoplasm Recurrence, Local-
dc.subject.meshNephrostomy, Percutaneous-
dc.subject.meshPelvic Neoplasms-
dc.subject.meshPrognosis-
dc.subject.meshSurvival Analysis-
dc.subject.meshSurvival Rate-
dc.subject.meshUreteral Obstruction-
dc.subject.meshUterine Cervical Neoplasms-
dc.titleUrinary tract obstruction and nephrostomy drainage in pelvic malignant disease.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Urology, Christie Hospital NHS Trust, Withington, Manchester, UK.en
dc.identifier.journalBritish Journal of Urologyen

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