2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10541/98844
Title:
Acromegaly: unravelling a complex disease.
Authors:
O'Halloran, Domhnall J; Shalet, Stephen M
Abstract:
Acromegaly is a rare endocrine disorder characterized by growth hormone hypersecretion and is usually caused by a pituitary macroadenoma. It is associated with significantly increased patient morbidity and mortality. Molecular biological studies have implicated a causative role for oncogenic mutations (activating Gs alpha mutations and/or chromosomal 11q13 deletions) in less than 50% of cases. The cause(s) in the remaining 50% is speculative. Epidemiological evidence indicates that biochemical cure is achieved when mean GH levels are 5mU/l or less during a day-profile. This GH value correlates well with that required to normalize the serum IGF-1 concentration, a GH-dependent peptide which can be used to monitor the disease activity in acromegaly. Treatment must be carried out under the supervision of a dedicated endocrinologist and tailored to patients needs. The success of any treatment modality (surgery/pituitary irradiation/medical) depends on adenoma size and the extent of pretreatment GH hypersecretion. A combination of therapies is usually required to achieve satisfactory control of adenoma growth and GH hypersecretion. Octreotide, a synthetic analogue of native somatostatin, is particularly effective in controlling GH hypersecretion in this condition and the widespread introduction of a long-acting depot preparation is eagerly awaited. The development of true GH deficiency as a result of treatment is potentially worrying in view of its possible contribution to the increased incidence of cardiovascular mortality associated with hypopituitarism.
Affiliation:
Department of Endocrinology, Christie Hospital NHS Trust, Manchester, UK.
Citation:
Acromegaly: unravelling a complex disease. 1995, 5 (3):119-24 Growth Regul
Journal:
Growth Regulation
Issue Date:
Sep-1995
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10541/98844
PubMed ID:
7580862
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
0956-523X
Appears in Collections:
All Christie Publications

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorO'Halloran, Domhnall Jen
dc.contributor.authorShalet, Stephen Men
dc.date.accessioned2010-05-14T11:09:02Z-
dc.date.available2010-05-14T11:09:02Z-
dc.date.issued1995-09-
dc.identifier.citationAcromegaly: unravelling a complex disease. 1995, 5 (3):119-24 Growth Regulen
dc.identifier.issn0956-523X-
dc.identifier.pmid7580862-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10541/98844-
dc.description.abstractAcromegaly is a rare endocrine disorder characterized by growth hormone hypersecretion and is usually caused by a pituitary macroadenoma. It is associated with significantly increased patient morbidity and mortality. Molecular biological studies have implicated a causative role for oncogenic mutations (activating Gs alpha mutations and/or chromosomal 11q13 deletions) in less than 50% of cases. The cause(s) in the remaining 50% is speculative. Epidemiological evidence indicates that biochemical cure is achieved when mean GH levels are 5mU/l or less during a day-profile. This GH value correlates well with that required to normalize the serum IGF-1 concentration, a GH-dependent peptide which can be used to monitor the disease activity in acromegaly. Treatment must be carried out under the supervision of a dedicated endocrinologist and tailored to patients needs. The success of any treatment modality (surgery/pituitary irradiation/medical) depends on adenoma size and the extent of pretreatment GH hypersecretion. A combination of therapies is usually required to achieve satisfactory control of adenoma growth and GH hypersecretion. Octreotide, a synthetic analogue of native somatostatin, is particularly effective in controlling GH hypersecretion in this condition and the widespread introduction of a long-acting depot preparation is eagerly awaited. The development of true GH deficiency as a result of treatment is potentially worrying in view of its possible contribution to the increased incidence of cardiovascular mortality associated with hypopituitarism.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.subjectPituitary Canceren
dc.subject.meshAcromegaly-
dc.subject.meshAdenoma-
dc.subject.meshChromosomes, Human, Pair 11-
dc.subject.meshGene Deletion-
dc.subject.meshGrowth Hormone-
dc.subject.meshHumans-
dc.subject.meshMutation-
dc.subject.meshPituitary Neoplasms-
dc.titleAcromegaly: unravelling a complex disease.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Endocrinology, Christie Hospital NHS Trust, Manchester, UK.en
dc.identifier.journalGrowth Regulationen

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