Clinical applications of composite and realtime megavoltage imaging.

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10541/98836
Title:
Clinical applications of composite and realtime megavoltage imaging.
Authors:
Kirby, Mike C; Kane, B; Williams, Peter C
Abstract:
The versatility of electronic portal imaging devices (EPIDs) is best demonstrated by their ability to perform novel megavoltage imaging protocols, which are still pertinent to good radiotherapy practice. This paper examines two such techniques: composite and realtime imaging. Our EPID can be programmed to acquire and manipulate images very easily, allowing images from segmented treatment protocols to be mixed and displayed, giving a composite image of the effective treatment result. Its use for verifying the efficacy of spinal shielding using a segmented, offset collimator technique is described. By acquiring images very quickly, realtime imaging sequences can be obtained and used to analyse anatomical movement within a single treatment field. The technique is employed here to investigate movement in radical lung, breast, abdomen, pelvis and thyroid treatments. Our results show that the protocol is vital for treatment sites involving the lungs; changes up to 5 mm have been observed in the maximum lung depth for breast treatments, and displacements up to 16 mm for radical lung treatments. It is also useful in other anatomical sites for ensuring that no movement occurs.
Affiliation:
North Western Medical Physics Department, Christie Hospital, Manchester, UK.
Citation:
Clinical applications of composite and realtime megavoltage imaging. 1995, 7 (5):308-16 Clin Oncol
Journal:
Clinical Oncology
Issue Date:
1995
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10541/98836
DOI:
10.1016/S0936-6555(05)80539-4
PubMed ID:
8580057
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
0936-6555
Appears in Collections:
All Christie Publications

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorKirby, Mike Cen
dc.contributor.authorKane, Ben
dc.contributor.authorWilliams, Peter Cen
dc.date.accessioned2010-05-14T09:56:57Z-
dc.date.available2010-05-14T09:56:57Z-
dc.date.issued1995-
dc.identifier.citationClinical applications of composite and realtime megavoltage imaging. 1995, 7 (5):308-16 Clin Oncolen
dc.identifier.issn0936-6555-
dc.identifier.pmid8580057-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/S0936-6555(05)80539-4-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10541/98836-
dc.description.abstractThe versatility of electronic portal imaging devices (EPIDs) is best demonstrated by their ability to perform novel megavoltage imaging protocols, which are still pertinent to good radiotherapy practice. This paper examines two such techniques: composite and realtime imaging. Our EPID can be programmed to acquire and manipulate images very easily, allowing images from segmented treatment protocols to be mixed and displayed, giving a composite image of the effective treatment result. Its use for verifying the efficacy of spinal shielding using a segmented, offset collimator technique is described. By acquiring images very quickly, realtime imaging sequences can be obtained and used to analyse anatomical movement within a single treatment field. The technique is employed here to investigate movement in radical lung, breast, abdomen, pelvis and thyroid treatments. Our results show that the protocol is vital for treatment sites involving the lungs; changes up to 5 mm have been observed in the maximum lung depth for breast treatments, and displacements up to 16 mm for radical lung treatments. It is also useful in other anatomical sites for ensuring that no movement occurs.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.subject.meshFluoroscopy-
dc.subject.meshHumans-
dc.subject.meshImage Processing, Computer-Assisted-
dc.subject.meshRadiotherapy, Computer-Assisted-
dc.subject.meshRadiotherapy, High-Energy-
dc.subject.meshSpine-
dc.titleClinical applications of composite and realtime megavoltage imaging.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentNorth Western Medical Physics Department, Christie Hospital, Manchester, UK.en
dc.identifier.journalClinical Oncologyen

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