Confiding in crisis: gender differences in pattern of confiding among cancer patients.

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10541/98095
Title:
Confiding in crisis: gender differences in pattern of confiding among cancer patients.
Authors:
Harrison, Judy; Maguire, Peter; Pitceathly, Carolyn
Abstract:
Social support has been identified as a key predictor of psychological morbidity following adverse life-events. However, the majority of the research has focused exclusively on women, despite evidence of significant gender difference in the utilisation and role of social support. To examine gender differences in patterns of confiding crisis, 520 subjects were interviewed within 8 weeks of a cancer diagnosis. Men were as likely as women to have confided their main concern in others (61% mainly or fully confided vs 67% of women, P = 0.308) but were much more likely to have used only one confidante (45% vs 25% of women, P < 0.001) while women made use of a wider circle of family, friends and partner and used more confidantes overall. The results confirm marked gender differences in the utilisation of social support at times of crisis and call into question the extent to which support research using exclusively female samples can be generalized.
Affiliation:
Cancer Research Campaign Psychological Medicine Group, Christie Hospital, Manchester, England.
Citation:
Confiding in crisis: gender differences in pattern of confiding among cancer patients. 1995, 41 (9):1255-60 Soc Sci Med
Journal:
Social Science & Medicine
Issue Date:
Nov-1995
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10541/98095
DOI:
10.1016/0277-9536(94)00411-L
PubMed ID:
8545678
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
0277-9536
Appears in Collections:
All Christie Publications

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorHarrison, Judyen
dc.contributor.authorMaguire, Peteren
dc.contributor.authorPitceathly, Carolynen
dc.date.accessioned2010-05-06T16:04:53Z-
dc.date.available2010-05-06T16:04:53Z-
dc.date.issued1995-11-
dc.identifier.citationConfiding in crisis: gender differences in pattern of confiding among cancer patients. 1995, 41 (9):1255-60 Soc Sci Meden
dc.identifier.issn0277-9536-
dc.identifier.pmid8545678-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/0277-9536(94)00411-L-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10541/98095-
dc.description.abstractSocial support has been identified as a key predictor of psychological morbidity following adverse life-events. However, the majority of the research has focused exclusively on women, despite evidence of significant gender difference in the utilisation and role of social support. To examine gender differences in patterns of confiding crisis, 520 subjects were interviewed within 8 weeks of a cancer diagnosis. Men were as likely as women to have confided their main concern in others (61% mainly or fully confided vs 67% of women, P = 0.308) but were much more likely to have used only one confidante (45% vs 25% of women, P < 0.001) while women made use of a wider circle of family, friends and partner and used more confidantes overall. The results confirm marked gender differences in the utilisation of social support at times of crisis and call into question the extent to which support research using exclusively female samples can be generalized.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.subjectCanceren
dc.subject.meshAdaptation, Psychological-
dc.subject.meshAdolescent-
dc.subject.meshAdult-
dc.subject.meshAged-
dc.subject.meshCrisis Intervention-
dc.subject.meshFamily-
dc.subject.meshFemale-
dc.subject.meshGender Identity-
dc.subject.meshHumans-
dc.subject.meshInterpersonal Relations-
dc.subject.meshMale-
dc.subject.meshMiddle Aged-
dc.subject.meshNeoplasms-
dc.subject.meshPersonality Assessment-
dc.subject.meshSelf Disclosure-
dc.subject.meshSick Role-
dc.subject.meshSocial Support-
dc.titleConfiding in crisis: gender differences in pattern of confiding among cancer patients.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentCancer Research Campaign Psychological Medicine Group, Christie Hospital, Manchester, England.en
dc.identifier.journalSocial Science & Medicineen

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