2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10541/97945
Title:
Pericyte differentiation.
Authors:
Schor, Ana M; Canfield, A E; Sutton, A B; Arciniegas, E; Allen, Terence D
Abstract:
Pericytes are defined in vivo by their location: They are embedded within the basement membrane of microvessels. They form an integral part of the microvascular wall and are believed to participate in angiogenesis, although their precise role is not clear. Pericytes derived from the retinal microvasculature have been cultured and identified by a series of phenotypic characteristics that clearly distinguishes them from other stromal cells such as smooth muscle cells. Pericytes in vitro form multicellular nodules rich in extracellular matrix. This matrix becomes mineralized in the presence of growth medium containing serum, without exogenous beta-glycerophosphate. These results indicate that pericytes represent primitive mesenchymal cells able to differentiate into an osteogenic phenotype. Pericyte differentiation also is defined by alterations in their response to transforming growth factor beta 1 and changes in the synthesis and/or deposition of various extracellular matrix proteins such as laminin, Type IV collagen, tenascin, Type X collagen osteonectin, and thrombospondin-1. Angiogenesis is associated commonly with mineralization. These data suggest that pericytes may contribute to mineralization in vivo.
Affiliation:
CRC Department of Medical Oncology, Manchester University, Christie Hospital NHS Trust, UK.
Citation:
Pericyte differentiation. 1995 (313):81-91 Clin. Orthop. Relat. Res.
Journal:
Clinical Orthopaedics and Related Research
Issue Date:
Apr-1995
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10541/97945
PubMed ID:
7543836
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
0009-921X
Appears in Collections:
All Paterson Institute for Cancer Research

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorSchor, Ana Men
dc.contributor.authorCanfield, A Een
dc.contributor.authorSutton, A Ben
dc.contributor.authorArciniegas, Een
dc.contributor.authorAllen, Terence Den
dc.date.accessioned2010-05-05T12:36:24Z-
dc.date.available2010-05-05T12:36:24Z-
dc.date.issued1995-04-
dc.identifier.citationPericyte differentiation. 1995 (313):81-91 Clin. Orthop. Relat. Res.en
dc.identifier.issn0009-921X-
dc.identifier.pmid7543836-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10541/97945-
dc.description.abstractPericytes are defined in vivo by their location: They are embedded within the basement membrane of microvessels. They form an integral part of the microvascular wall and are believed to participate in angiogenesis, although their precise role is not clear. Pericytes derived from the retinal microvasculature have been cultured and identified by a series of phenotypic characteristics that clearly distinguishes them from other stromal cells such as smooth muscle cells. Pericytes in vitro form multicellular nodules rich in extracellular matrix. This matrix becomes mineralized in the presence of growth medium containing serum, without exogenous beta-glycerophosphate. These results indicate that pericytes represent primitive mesenchymal cells able to differentiate into an osteogenic phenotype. Pericyte differentiation also is defined by alterations in their response to transforming growth factor beta 1 and changes in the synthesis and/or deposition of various extracellular matrix proteins such as laminin, Type IV collagen, tenascin, Type X collagen osteonectin, and thrombospondin-1. Angiogenesis is associated commonly with mineralization. These data suggest that pericytes may contribute to mineralization in vivo.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.subject.meshAnimals-
dc.subject.meshBasement Membrane-
dc.subject.meshBlotting, Northern-
dc.subject.meshCattle-
dc.subject.meshCell Adhesion Molecules-
dc.subject.meshCell Differentiation-
dc.subject.meshCells, Cultured-
dc.subject.meshExtracellular Matrix-
dc.subject.meshExtracellular Matrix Proteins-
dc.subject.meshImmunoblotting-
dc.subject.meshMembrane Glycoproteins-
dc.subject.meshMicrocirculation-
dc.subject.meshMicroscopy, Electron-
dc.subject.meshNeovascularization, Pathologic-
dc.subject.meshOsteonectin-
dc.subject.meshRetinal Vessels-
dc.subject.meshThrombospondins-
dc.subject.meshTransforming Growth Factor beta-
dc.titlePericyte differentiation.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentCRC Department of Medical Oncology, Manchester University, Christie Hospital NHS Trust, UK.en
dc.identifier.journalClinical Orthopaedics and Related Researchen

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