bcl-2 delay of alkylating agent-induced apoptotic death in a murine hemopoietic stem cell line.

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10541/96943
Title:
bcl-2 delay of alkylating agent-induced apoptotic death in a murine hemopoietic stem cell line.
Authors:
Fairbairn, Leslie J; Cowling, Graham J; Dexter, T Michael; Rafferty, Joseph A; Margison, Geoffrey P; Reipert, Brigit M
Abstract:
Many cytotoxic agents kill cells by invoking a specific death pathway termed physiological cell death, or apoptosis. Treatment of a murine hemopoietic stem cell line, FDCP-mix, with methylmethanesulfonate (MMS) or N'-methyl-N'-nitrosourea (MNU) leads to death by apoptosis. Retroviral gene transfer was used to overexpress the bcl-2 oncogene in FDCP-mix cells, and this was associated with a delay in apoptosis in these cells after treatment with MNU and MMS and decreased sensitivity of colony formation to the cytotoxic effects of MMS. These data suggest an explanation for the refractory nature of bcl-2-expressing follicular lymphoma to cytotoxic chemotherapy and furthermore suggest that DNA-damaging antitumor therapy may contribute to the progression of disease.
Affiliation:
CRC Department of Experimental Haematology, Paterson Institute for Cancer Research, Christie Hospital National Health Service Trust, Manchester, United Kingdom.
Citation:
bcl-2 delay of alkylating agent-induced apoptotic death in a murine hemopoietic stem cell line. 1994, 11 (1):49-55 Mol. Carcinog.
Journal:
Molecular Carcinogenesis
Issue Date:
Sep-1994
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10541/96943
DOI:
10.1002/mc.2940110109
PubMed ID:
7916990
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
0899-1987
Appears in Collections:
All Paterson Institute for Cancer Research

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorFairbairn, Leslie Jen
dc.contributor.authorCowling, Graham Jen
dc.contributor.authorDexter, T Michaelen
dc.contributor.authorRafferty, Joseph Aen
dc.contributor.authorMargison, Geoffrey Pen
dc.contributor.authorReipert, Brigit Men
dc.date.accessioned2010-04-20T15:58:13Z-
dc.date.available2010-04-20T15:58:13Z-
dc.date.issued1994-09-
dc.identifier.citationbcl-2 delay of alkylating agent-induced apoptotic death in a murine hemopoietic stem cell line. 1994, 11 (1):49-55 Mol. Carcinog.en
dc.identifier.issn0899-1987-
dc.identifier.pmid7916990-
dc.identifier.doi10.1002/mc.2940110109-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10541/96943-
dc.description.abstractMany cytotoxic agents kill cells by invoking a specific death pathway termed physiological cell death, or apoptosis. Treatment of a murine hemopoietic stem cell line, FDCP-mix, with methylmethanesulfonate (MMS) or N'-methyl-N'-nitrosourea (MNU) leads to death by apoptosis. Retroviral gene transfer was used to overexpress the bcl-2 oncogene in FDCP-mix cells, and this was associated with a delay in apoptosis in these cells after treatment with MNU and MMS and decreased sensitivity of colony formation to the cytotoxic effects of MMS. These data suggest an explanation for the refractory nature of bcl-2-expressing follicular lymphoma to cytotoxic chemotherapy and furthermore suggest that DNA-damaging antitumor therapy may contribute to the progression of disease.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.subjectHaematopoiesisen
dc.subjectHaematopoietic Stem Cellsen
dc.subject.meshAnimals-
dc.subject.meshApoptosis-
dc.subject.meshDNA Repair-
dc.subject.meshHematopoiesis-
dc.subject.meshHematopoietic Stem Cells-
dc.subject.meshMethyl Methanesulfonate-
dc.subject.meshMethylnitrosourea-
dc.subject.meshMice-
dc.subject.meshProto-Oncogene Proteins-
dc.subject.meshProto-Oncogene Proteins c-bcl-2-
dc.titlebcl-2 delay of alkylating agent-induced apoptotic death in a murine hemopoietic stem cell line.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentCRC Department of Experimental Haematology, Paterson Institute for Cancer Research, Christie Hospital National Health Service Trust, Manchester, United Kingdom.en
dc.identifier.journalMolecular Carcinogenesisen
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