Colonic mucosal replacement by syngeneic small intestinal stem cell transplantation.

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10541/96205
Title:
Colonic mucosal replacement by syngeneic small intestinal stem cell transplantation.
Authors:
Tait, I S; Evans, Gareth S; Flint, Neil; Campbell, F C
Abstract:
A novel method of colonic mucosal replacement by transplantation of disaggregated small intestinal epithelium is described. Thirty-one inbred rats had the ascending colon isolated, and surgical mucosectomy was performed on the "free" loop. Epithelial cell aggregates were isolated from postnatal small intestine using collagenase and dispase digestion, then 20 microL of the cell suspension was "seeded" over the denuded colonic muscle of 25 recipient rats. Six control rats had surgical mucosectomy only. All loops were retrieved after 14 days for histologic examination. Stem cell lineage studies were used with selective staining protocols to identify enterocytes, goblet cells, entero-endocrine cells, and Paneth cells. A neomucosa with typical small bowel morphology including crypts and villi and all four stem cell lineages was regenerated by transplanted cells on the colonic muscle in 19 of 25 (76%) recipients. Control loops showed no epithelial regrowth confirming total mucosectomy. With appropriate stromal support, transplanted small intestinal stem cells have the capacity to re-epithelialize denuded colonic muscle with small bowel neomucosa.
Affiliation:
University Department of Surgery, Ninewells Hospital and Medical School, Dundee, Scotland.
Citation:
Colonic mucosal replacement by syngeneic small intestinal stem cell transplantation. 1994, 167 (1):67-72 Am. J. Surg.
Journal:
American Journal of Surgery
Issue Date:
Jan-1994
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10541/96205
DOI:
10.1016/0002-9610(94)90055-8
PubMed ID:
8311142
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
0002-9610
Appears in Collections:
All Paterson Institute for Cancer Research

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorTait, I Sen
dc.contributor.authorEvans, Gareth Sen
dc.contributor.authorFlint, Neilen
dc.contributor.authorCampbell, F Cen
dc.date.accessioned2010-04-09T14:45:42Z-
dc.date.available2010-04-09T14:45:42Z-
dc.date.issued1994-01-
dc.identifier.citationColonic mucosal replacement by syngeneic small intestinal stem cell transplantation. 1994, 167 (1):67-72 Am. J. Surg.en
dc.identifier.issn0002-9610-
dc.identifier.pmid8311142-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/0002-9610(94)90055-8-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10541/96205-
dc.description.abstractA novel method of colonic mucosal replacement by transplantation of disaggregated small intestinal epithelium is described. Thirty-one inbred rats had the ascending colon isolated, and surgical mucosectomy was performed on the "free" loop. Epithelial cell aggregates were isolated from postnatal small intestine using collagenase and dispase digestion, then 20 microL of the cell suspension was "seeded" over the denuded colonic muscle of 25 recipient rats. Six control rats had surgical mucosectomy only. All loops were retrieved after 14 days for histologic examination. Stem cell lineage studies were used with selective staining protocols to identify enterocytes, goblet cells, entero-endocrine cells, and Paneth cells. A neomucosa with typical small bowel morphology including crypts and villi and all four stem cell lineages was regenerated by transplanted cells on the colonic muscle in 19 of 25 (76%) recipients. Control loops showed no epithelial regrowth confirming total mucosectomy. With appropriate stromal support, transplanted small intestinal stem cells have the capacity to re-epithelialize denuded colonic muscle with small bowel neomucosa.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.subject.meshAnimals-
dc.subject.meshColon-
dc.subject.meshEpithelial Cells-
dc.subject.meshIntestinal Mucosa-
dc.subject.meshIntestine, Small-
dc.subject.meshRats-
dc.subject.meshRats, Inbred Strains-
dc.subject.meshStem Cell Transplantation-
dc.titleColonic mucosal replacement by syngeneic small intestinal stem cell transplantation.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity Department of Surgery, Ninewells Hospital and Medical School, Dundee, Scotland.en
dc.identifier.journalAmerican Journal of Surgeryen

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