An intensive multiagent chemotherapy regimen for brain tumours occurring in very young children.

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10541/96018
Title:
An intensive multiagent chemotherapy regimen for brain tumours occurring in very young children.
Authors:
Lashford, Linda S; Campbell, Richard H A; Gattamaneni, Rao; Robinson, Kath; Walker, David; Bailey, Cliff
Abstract:
Standard treatment for the majority of malignant brain tumours consists of surgery and radiotherapy. This treatment has late morbidity which is accentuated in the very young child. As part of a strategy to improve quality of life and overall survival of young children with brain tumours, members of the United Kingdom Children's Cancer Study Group (UKCCSG) have piloted an intensive chemotherapy regimen which aims to avoid or delay radiotherapy following surgery. Twenty eight children with a variety of malignant brain tumours have received the regimen, which contains carboplatin, vincristine, cyclophosphamide, methotrexate, and cisplatin. The treatment is toxic, resulting in one death from infection. The bulk of the toxicity was associated with the administration of carboplatin. All but three children eventually required adjuvant radiotherapy and this was given between 1.5 and 27 months from diagnosis (median delay to radiotherapy, 12 months). Using this treatment regimen, overall survival at four years is 35% (confidence intervals 10% to 60%). While there is no evidence from this study that radiotherapy can be abandoned in the management of malignant brain tumours, its introduction may be delayed using suitable chemotherapy, thus allowing time for further CNS development. This treatment strategy has been taken forward as an international clinical trial run through the International Society for Paediatric Oncology, but using a smaller dose of carboplatin to reduce toxicity.
Affiliation:
United Kingdom Children's Cancer Study Group (UKCCSG) Brain Tumour Group: Christie Hospital NHS Trust, Withington, Manchester.
Citation:
An intensive multiagent chemotherapy regimen for brain tumours occurring in very young children. 1996, 74 (3):219-23 Arch. Dis. Child.
Journal:
Archives of Disease in Childhood
Issue Date:
Mar-1996
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10541/96018
PubMed ID:
8787426
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
1468-2044
Appears in Collections:
All Christie Publications

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorLashford, Linda Sen
dc.contributor.authorCampbell, Richard H Aen
dc.contributor.authorGattamaneni, Raoen
dc.contributor.authorRobinson, Kathen
dc.contributor.authorWalker, Daviden
dc.contributor.authorBailey, Cliffen
dc.date.accessioned2010-04-08T14:32:06Z-
dc.date.available2010-04-08T14:32:06Z-
dc.date.issued1996-03-
dc.identifier.citationAn intensive multiagent chemotherapy regimen for brain tumours occurring in very young children. 1996, 74 (3):219-23 Arch. Dis. Child.en
dc.identifier.issn1468-2044-
dc.identifier.pmid8787426-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10541/96018-
dc.description.abstractStandard treatment for the majority of malignant brain tumours consists of surgery and radiotherapy. This treatment has late morbidity which is accentuated in the very young child. As part of a strategy to improve quality of life and overall survival of young children with brain tumours, members of the United Kingdom Children's Cancer Study Group (UKCCSG) have piloted an intensive chemotherapy regimen which aims to avoid or delay radiotherapy following surgery. Twenty eight children with a variety of malignant brain tumours have received the regimen, which contains carboplatin, vincristine, cyclophosphamide, methotrexate, and cisplatin. The treatment is toxic, resulting in one death from infection. The bulk of the toxicity was associated with the administration of carboplatin. All but three children eventually required adjuvant radiotherapy and this was given between 1.5 and 27 months from diagnosis (median delay to radiotherapy, 12 months). Using this treatment regimen, overall survival at four years is 35% (confidence intervals 10% to 60%). While there is no evidence from this study that radiotherapy can be abandoned in the management of malignant brain tumours, its introduction may be delayed using suitable chemotherapy, thus allowing time for further CNS development. This treatment strategy has been taken forward as an international clinical trial run through the International Society for Paediatric Oncology, but using a smaller dose of carboplatin to reduce toxicity.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.subjectBrain Canceren
dc.subject.meshAge Distribution-
dc.subject.meshAntineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols-
dc.subject.meshBrain Neoplasms-
dc.subject.meshCarboplatin-
dc.subject.meshChild, Preschool-
dc.subject.meshCisplatin-
dc.subject.meshCyclophosphamide-
dc.subject.meshDisease-Free Survival-
dc.subject.meshDrug Administration Schedule-
dc.subject.meshFollow-Up Studies-
dc.subject.meshHumans-
dc.subject.meshInfant-
dc.subject.meshMethotrexate-
dc.subject.meshPilot Projects-
dc.subject.meshRadiotherapy, Adjuvant-
dc.subject.meshSurvival Rate-
dc.subject.meshVincristine-
dc.titleAn intensive multiagent chemotherapy regimen for brain tumours occurring in very young children.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentUnited Kingdom Children's Cancer Study Group (UKCCSG) Brain Tumour Group: Christie Hospital NHS Trust, Withington, Manchester.en
dc.identifier.journalArchives of Disease in Childhooden

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