2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10541/95877
Title:
Nuclear pore clustering is a consistent feature of apoptosis in vitro.
Authors:
Reipert, Siegfried; Reipert, Brigit M; Hickman, John A; Allen, Terence D
Abstract:
Two cell lines which show different patterns of DNA fragmentation have been examined for variations of their nuclear morphology during apoptosis. FDCP-Mix, a pluripotent murine haemopoietic stem cell line which undergoes typical internucleosomal cleavage of DNA when induced to apoptosis either by drugs or withdrawal of growth factor (IL-3) was compared with the human lymphoid leukemia cell line MOLT-4, a cell line which undergoes apoptosis without production of a typical DNA 'ladder'. The nuclear morphology of FDCP-Mix cells was consistent after apoptotic induction by drug or by growth factor withdrawal. Apoptotic nuclear morphology for MOLT-4 and FDCP-Mix showed variations in the distribution, density and texture of the electron dense nuclear marginations. Despite these differences, clustering of nuclear pore complexes (NPCs) after treatment with the topoisomerase II inhibitor etoposide was a common phenomenon for both cell lines. Moreover, pore clustering for FDCP-Mix nuclei occurred independently from the way in which apoptosis was induced, either by growth factor withdrawal or etoposide treatment. In a novel approach, we visualised the clustering of NPCs three-dimensionally by field emission in-lens scanning electron microscopy (FEISEM).
Affiliation:
CRC, Department of Structural Cell Biology, Paterson Institute for Cancer Research and Christie Hospital, Manchester, UK.
Citation:
Nuclear pore clustering is a consistent feature of apoptosis in vitro. 1996, 3 (1):131-9 Cell Death Differ.
Journal:
Cell Death and Differentiation
Issue Date:
Jan-1996
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10541/95877
PubMed ID:
17180065
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
1350-9047
Appears in Collections:
All Paterson Institute for Cancer Research

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorReipert, Siegfrieden
dc.contributor.authorReipert, Brigit Men
dc.contributor.authorHickman, John Aen
dc.contributor.authorAllen, Terence Den
dc.date.accessioned2010-04-07T13:14:54Z-
dc.date.available2010-04-07T13:14:54Z-
dc.date.issued1996-01-
dc.identifier.citationNuclear pore clustering is a consistent feature of apoptosis in vitro. 1996, 3 (1):131-9 Cell Death Differ.en
dc.identifier.issn1350-9047-
dc.identifier.pmid17180065-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10541/95877-
dc.description.abstractTwo cell lines which show different patterns of DNA fragmentation have been examined for variations of their nuclear morphology during apoptosis. FDCP-Mix, a pluripotent murine haemopoietic stem cell line which undergoes typical internucleosomal cleavage of DNA when induced to apoptosis either by drugs or withdrawal of growth factor (IL-3) was compared with the human lymphoid leukemia cell line MOLT-4, a cell line which undergoes apoptosis without production of a typical DNA 'ladder'. The nuclear morphology of FDCP-Mix cells was consistent after apoptotic induction by drug or by growth factor withdrawal. Apoptotic nuclear morphology for MOLT-4 and FDCP-Mix showed variations in the distribution, density and texture of the electron dense nuclear marginations. Despite these differences, clustering of nuclear pore complexes (NPCs) after treatment with the topoisomerase II inhibitor etoposide was a common phenomenon for both cell lines. Moreover, pore clustering for FDCP-Mix nuclei occurred independently from the way in which apoptosis was induced, either by growth factor withdrawal or etoposide treatment. In a novel approach, we visualised the clustering of NPCs three-dimensionally by field emission in-lens scanning electron microscopy (FEISEM).en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.subjectApoptosisen
dc.subjectHaemopoietic Stem Cellsen
dc.subjectLeukaemiaen
dc.subjectNuclear Pore Clusteringen
dc.titleNuclear pore clustering is a consistent feature of apoptosis in vitro.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentCRC, Department of Structural Cell Biology, Paterson Institute for Cancer Research and Christie Hospital, Manchester, UK.en
dc.identifier.journalCell Death and Differentiationen
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