Changes in the cellularity of the cortex of human hairs as an indicator of radiation exposure.

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10541/95699
Title:
Changes in the cellularity of the cortex of human hairs as an indicator of radiation exposure.
Authors:
Potten, Christopher S; Burt, Paul A; Roberts, Stephen A; Deshpande, N A; Williams, Peter C; Ramsden, J
Abstract:
Growing hair follicles with their rapid cell proliferation would be expected to be sensitive organs to cytotoxic agents such as radiation. Various abnormalities in the hair and hair follicles have been reported in the past. Changes in the number of cells in the newly forming hair cortex have been shown in the mouse to be one of the more sensitive assays for radiation effects, and this approach could provide a basis for a biological dosimeter. Here we show for the first time using hair cortex cell counts some preliminary data indicating that the number of cell nuclei in a unit of length (140 microns) of the cortex of human hairs from the chest and scalp of patients undergoing fractionated radiotherapy falls significantly (P = 0.005) by 5%-10% 3 days after the first dose in a fractionated sequence of irradiations. The first dose was delivered on a Friday, and no further exposures were delivered until after the hair sample was taken on the 3rd day (Monday). No significant effect of radiation dose could be detected over the available. limited range of doses studied (5-6.5 Gy with one exit dose sample at 2.6 Gy). Also, the width varies from hair to hair. If the width of the hair is taken into account and the cortical nuclei counts are normalised to the width of each hair, the effects seen at day 3 become slightly more significant (P = 0.002), and those at day 5 also become significant (P = 0.012). Samples taken on the 5th day after the first (Friday) exposure were also 2 days after the second exposure and 1 day after the third exposure. However, little expression of damage attributable to the 2nd and 3rd exposures was anticipated since their effects would take some time to be expressed in the cortical region examined, which is some distance from the proliferative region of the follicle.
Affiliation:
CRC Department of Epithelial Cell Biology, Paterson Institute for Cancer Research, Christie Hospital NHS Trust, Manchester, UK.
Citation:
Changes in the cellularity of the cortex of human hairs as an indicator of radiation exposure. 1996, 35 (2):121-5 Radiat Environ Biophys
Journal:
Radiation and Environmental Biophysics
Issue Date:
May-1996
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10541/95699
DOI:
10.1007/BF02434035
PubMed ID:
8792460
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
0301-634X
Appears in Collections:
All Christie Publications ; All Paterson Institute for Cancer Research

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorPotten, Christopher Sen
dc.contributor.authorBurt, Paul Aen
dc.contributor.authorRoberts, Stephen Aen
dc.contributor.authorDeshpande, N Aen
dc.contributor.authorWilliams, Peter Cen
dc.contributor.authorRamsden, Jen
dc.date.accessioned2010-04-06T11:21:38Z-
dc.date.available2010-04-06T11:21:38Z-
dc.date.issued1996-05-
dc.identifier.citationChanges in the cellularity of the cortex of human hairs as an indicator of radiation exposure. 1996, 35 (2):121-5 Radiat Environ Biophysen
dc.identifier.issn0301-634X-
dc.identifier.pmid8792460-
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/BF02434035-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10541/95699-
dc.description.abstractGrowing hair follicles with their rapid cell proliferation would be expected to be sensitive organs to cytotoxic agents such as radiation. Various abnormalities in the hair and hair follicles have been reported in the past. Changes in the number of cells in the newly forming hair cortex have been shown in the mouse to be one of the more sensitive assays for radiation effects, and this approach could provide a basis for a biological dosimeter. Here we show for the first time using hair cortex cell counts some preliminary data indicating that the number of cell nuclei in a unit of length (140 microns) of the cortex of human hairs from the chest and scalp of patients undergoing fractionated radiotherapy falls significantly (P = 0.005) by 5%-10% 3 days after the first dose in a fractionated sequence of irradiations. The first dose was delivered on a Friday, and no further exposures were delivered until after the hair sample was taken on the 3rd day (Monday). No significant effect of radiation dose could be detected over the available. limited range of doses studied (5-6.5 Gy with one exit dose sample at 2.6 Gy). Also, the width varies from hair to hair. If the width of the hair is taken into account and the cortical nuclei counts are normalised to the width of each hair, the effects seen at day 3 become slightly more significant (P = 0.002), and those at day 5 also become significant (P = 0.012). Samples taken on the 5th day after the first (Friday) exposure were also 2 days after the second exposure and 1 day after the third exposure. However, little expression of damage attributable to the 2nd and 3rd exposures was anticipated since their effects would take some time to be expressed in the cortical region examined, which is some distance from the proliferative region of the follicle.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.subjectCancer Metastasisen
dc.subjectCanceren
dc.subject.meshCell Count-
dc.subject.meshCell Division-
dc.subject.meshDose-Response Relationship, Radiation-
dc.subject.meshHair Follicle-
dc.subject.meshHumans-
dc.subject.meshLinear Models-
dc.subject.meshMicroscopy, Confocal-
dc.subject.meshNeoplasm Metastasis-
dc.subject.meshNeoplasms-
dc.subject.meshRadiotherapy-
dc.titleChanges in the cellularity of the cortex of human hairs as an indicator of radiation exposure.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentCRC Department of Epithelial Cell Biology, Paterson Institute for Cancer Research, Christie Hospital NHS Trust, Manchester, UK.en
dc.identifier.journalRadiation and Environmental Biophysicsen

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