A recombinant vaccinia virus encoding human papillomavirus types 16 and 18, E6 and E7 proteins as immunotherapy for cervical cancer.

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10541/95528
Title:
A recombinant vaccinia virus encoding human papillomavirus types 16 and 18, E6 and E7 proteins as immunotherapy for cervical cancer.
Authors:
Borysiewicz, L K; Fiander, A; Nimako, M; Man, S; Wilkinson, G W; Westmoreland, D; Evans, A S; Adams, M; Stacey, Simon N; Boursnell, M E; Rutherford, E; Hickling, J K; Inglis, S C
Abstract:
BACKGROUND: Human papillomavirus (HPV) infection, especially with type 16 or 18, is associated with cervical cancer. Two HPV proteins, E6 and E7, are consistently expressed in tumour cells. The objectives of the study were to examine the clinical and environmental safety and immunogenicity in the first clinical trial of a live recombinant vaccinia virus expressing the E6 and E7 proteins of HPV 16 and 18 (TA-HPV). METHODS: The study was an open label phase I/II trial in eight patients with late stage cervical cancer. The patients were vaccinated with a single dose of TA-HPV and kept in strict isolation to monitor local and systemic side-effects, environmental spread, and anti-E6/E7 immune responses. FINDINGS: Vaccination resulted in no significant clinical side-effects and there was no environmental contamination by live TA-HPV. Each patient mounted an antivaccinia antibody response and three of the eight patients developed an HPV-specific antibody response that could be ascribed to the vaccination. HPV-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes, the effector mechanism most likely to be of therapeutic benefit, were detected in one of three evaluable patients. INTERPRETATION: Further studies to investigate the use ot TA-HPV for immunotherapy of cervical cancer are warranted.
Affiliation:
Department of Medicine, University of Wales College of Medicine, Cardiff, UK.
Citation:
A recombinant vaccinia virus encoding human papillomavirus types 16 and 18, E6 and E7 proteins as immunotherapy for cervical cancer. 1996, 347 (9014):1523-7 Lancet
Journal:
Lancet
Issue Date:
1-Jun-1996
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10541/95528
DOI:
10.1016/S0140-6736(96)90674-1
PubMed ID:
8684105
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
0140-6736
Appears in Collections:
All Paterson Institute for Cancer Research

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorBorysiewicz, L Ken
dc.contributor.authorFiander, Aen
dc.contributor.authorNimako, Men
dc.contributor.authorMan, Sen
dc.contributor.authorWilkinson, G Wen
dc.contributor.authorWestmoreland, Den
dc.contributor.authorEvans, A Sen
dc.contributor.authorAdams, Men
dc.contributor.authorStacey, Simon Nen
dc.contributor.authorBoursnell, M Een
dc.contributor.authorRutherford, Een
dc.contributor.authorHickling, J Ken
dc.contributor.authorInglis, S Cen
dc.date.accessioned2010-04-01T16:19:59Z-
dc.date.available2010-04-01T16:19:59Z-
dc.date.issued1996-06-01-
dc.identifier.citationA recombinant vaccinia virus encoding human papillomavirus types 16 and 18, E6 and E7 proteins as immunotherapy for cervical cancer. 1996, 347 (9014):1523-7 Lanceten
dc.identifier.issn0140-6736-
dc.identifier.pmid8684105-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/S0140-6736(96)90674-1-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10541/95528-
dc.description.abstractBACKGROUND: Human papillomavirus (HPV) infection, especially with type 16 or 18, is associated with cervical cancer. Two HPV proteins, E6 and E7, are consistently expressed in tumour cells. The objectives of the study were to examine the clinical and environmental safety and immunogenicity in the first clinical trial of a live recombinant vaccinia virus expressing the E6 and E7 proteins of HPV 16 and 18 (TA-HPV). METHODS: The study was an open label phase I/II trial in eight patients with late stage cervical cancer. The patients were vaccinated with a single dose of TA-HPV and kept in strict isolation to monitor local and systemic side-effects, environmental spread, and anti-E6/E7 immune responses. FINDINGS: Vaccination resulted in no significant clinical side-effects and there was no environmental contamination by live TA-HPV. Each patient mounted an antivaccinia antibody response and three of the eight patients developed an HPV-specific antibody response that could be ascribed to the vaccination. HPV-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes, the effector mechanism most likely to be of therapeutic benefit, were detected in one of three evaluable patients. INTERPRETATION: Further studies to investigate the use ot TA-HPV for immunotherapy of cervical cancer are warranted.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.subjectUterine Cervical Canceren
dc.subject.meshAdult-
dc.subject.meshAged-
dc.subject.meshAntibodies, Viral-
dc.subject.meshDNA-Binding Proteins-
dc.subject.meshFemale-
dc.subject.meshHumans-
dc.subject.meshImmunotherapy, Active-
dc.subject.meshMiddle Aged-
dc.subject.meshOncogene Proteins, Viral-
dc.subject.meshPapillomaviridae-
dc.subject.meshPapillomavirus Vaccines-
dc.subject.meshRepressor Proteins-
dc.subject.meshT-Lymphocytes, Cytotoxic-
dc.subject.meshUterine Cervical Neoplasms-
dc.subject.meshVaccines, Synthetic-
dc.subject.meshVaccinia virus-
dc.subject.meshViral Vaccines-
dc.titleA recombinant vaccinia virus encoding human papillomavirus types 16 and 18, E6 and E7 proteins as immunotherapy for cervical cancer.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Medicine, University of Wales College of Medicine, Cardiff, UK.en
dc.identifier.journalLanceten

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