2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10541/95486
Title:
Graft dysfunction following liver transplantation: role of free radicals.
Authors:
Bzeizi, K I; Dawkes, R; Dodd, Nicholas J F; Plevris, J N; Hayes, P C
Abstract:
BACKGROUND/AIMS: Following orthotopic liver transplantation primary graft non-function occurs in about 10% of patients, and survival depends on early retransplantation. The aetiology has yet to be defined, but reperfusion injury as a result of free radical production has been considered as a possible mechanism. In this study we looked for evidence of free radical generation intraoperatively and assessed the relationship between free radical production and graft function. METHODS/RESULTS: Twenty-one patients (M:F 10:11, mean age; 53 +/- 3.8 years) who underwent liver transplantation for end-stage liver disease were studied. Free radical activity increased significantly following reperfusion, as shown by: (i) the diene conjugated method, where the percentage molar ratio increased from a baseline of 10.87 +/- 0.78% to 24.42 +/- 7.8% (p < 0.01), and (ii) by electron paramagnetic resonance, where a more than a twofold rise in radical concentration was detected (p < 0.05). The increase in free radical activity detected by the diene conjugated method was significantly higher in patients with poor outcome as compared with those who had uneventful recovery (p < 0.01). CONCLUSION: Free radical activity is increased following reperfusion of liver graft during transplantation, and the magnitude of the rise is related to the severity of graft dysfunction.
Affiliation:
Scottish Liver Transplant Unit, Royal Infirmary of Edinburgh, UK.
Citation:
Graft dysfunction following liver transplantation: role of free radicals. 1997, 26 (1):69-74 J. Hepatol.
Journal:
Journal of Hepatology
Issue Date:
Jan-1997
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10541/95486
DOI:
10.1016/S0168-8278(97)80011-6
PubMed ID:
9148025
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
0168-8278
Appears in Collections:
All Paterson Institute for Cancer Research

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorBzeizi, K Ien
dc.contributor.authorDawkes, Ren
dc.contributor.authorDodd, Nicholas J Fen
dc.contributor.authorPlevris, J Nen
dc.contributor.authorHayes, P Cen
dc.date.accessioned2010-04-01T14:01:18Z-
dc.date.available2010-04-01T14:01:18Z-
dc.date.issued1997-01-
dc.identifier.citationGraft dysfunction following liver transplantation: role of free radicals. 1997, 26 (1):69-74 J. Hepatol.en
dc.identifier.issn0168-8278-
dc.identifier.pmid9148025-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/S0168-8278(97)80011-6-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10541/95486-
dc.description.abstractBACKGROUND/AIMS: Following orthotopic liver transplantation primary graft non-function occurs in about 10% of patients, and survival depends on early retransplantation. The aetiology has yet to be defined, but reperfusion injury as a result of free radical production has been considered as a possible mechanism. In this study we looked for evidence of free radical generation intraoperatively and assessed the relationship between free radical production and graft function. METHODS/RESULTS: Twenty-one patients (M:F 10:11, mean age; 53 +/- 3.8 years) who underwent liver transplantation for end-stage liver disease were studied. Free radical activity increased significantly following reperfusion, as shown by: (i) the diene conjugated method, where the percentage molar ratio increased from a baseline of 10.87 +/- 0.78% to 24.42 +/- 7.8% (p < 0.01), and (ii) by electron paramagnetic resonance, where a more than a twofold rise in radical concentration was detected (p < 0.05). The increase in free radical activity detected by the diene conjugated method was significantly higher in patients with poor outcome as compared with those who had uneventful recovery (p < 0.01). CONCLUSION: Free radical activity is increased following reperfusion of liver graft during transplantation, and the magnitude of the rise is related to the severity of graft dysfunction.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.subject.meshBiological Markers-
dc.subject.meshFemale-
dc.subject.meshFree Radicals-
dc.subject.meshGraft Survival-
dc.subject.meshHumans-
dc.subject.meshIntraoperative Care-
dc.subject.meshLinear Models-
dc.subject.meshLiver Failure-
dc.subject.meshLiver Transplantation-
dc.subject.meshMale-
dc.subject.meshMiddle Aged-
dc.titleGraft dysfunction following liver transplantation: role of free radicals.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentScottish Liver Transplant Unit, Royal Infirmary of Edinburgh, UK.en
dc.identifier.journalJournal of Hepatologyen

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