Differences in serological IgA responses to recombinant baculovirus-derived human papillomavirus E2 protein in the natural history of cervical neoplasia.

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10541/95179
Title:
Differences in serological IgA responses to recombinant baculovirus-derived human papillomavirus E2 protein in the natural history of cervical neoplasia.
Authors:
Rocha-Zavaleta, L; Jordan, D; Pepper, Stuart D; Corbitt, G; Clarke, F; Maitland, N J; Sanders, C M; Arrand, John R; Stern, Peter L; Stacey, S N
Abstract:
Infection with certain types of human papillomavirus (HPV) presents a high risk for the subsequent development of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) and cervical carcinoma. Immunological mechanisms are likely to play a role in control of cervical HPV lesions. The HPV E2 protein has roles in virus replication and transcription, and loss of E2 functions may be associated with progression of cervical neoplasia. Accordingly, it is of interest to monitor immune responses to the E2 protein, and previous studies have reported associations between serological reactivity to E2 peptide antigens and cervical neoplasia. In order to investigate serological responses to native, full-length E2 protein, we expressed HPV-16 E2 proteins with and without an N-terminal polyhistidine tag using the baculovirus system. Purified HPV-16 E2 protein was used to develop enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays to detect serological IgG and IgA responses in cervical neoplasia patients and controls. We found that serum IgA levels against the E2 protein were elevated in CIN patients relative to normal control subjects but were not elevated in cervical cancer patients. Moreover, there appeared to be a gradient of response within cervical neoplasia such that the highest antibody levels were seen in lower grades of neoplasia up to CIN 2, whereas lower levels were observed in CIN 3 and still lower levels in cervical carcinoma. These findings suggest that the IgA antibody response to E2 may associate with stage and progression in cervical neoplasia.
Affiliation:
Department of Molecular Biology, Paterson Institute for Cancer Research, Christie Hospital NHS Trust, Manchester, UK.
Citation:
Differences in serological IgA responses to recombinant baculovirus-derived human papillomavirus E2 protein in the natural history of cervical neoplasia. 1997, 75 (8):1144-50 Br. J. Cancer
Journal:
British Journal of Cancer
Issue Date:
1997
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10541/95179
PubMed ID:
9099962
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
0007-0920
Appears in Collections:
All Paterson Institute for Cancer Research

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorRocha-Zavaleta, Len
dc.contributor.authorJordan, Den
dc.contributor.authorPepper, Stuart Den
dc.contributor.authorCorbitt, Gen
dc.contributor.authorClarke, Fen
dc.contributor.authorMaitland, N Jen
dc.contributor.authorSanders, C Men
dc.contributor.authorArrand, John Ren
dc.contributor.authorStern, Peter Len
dc.contributor.authorStacey, S Nen
dc.date.accessioned2010-03-29T14:14:38Z-
dc.date.available2010-03-29T14:14:38Z-
dc.date.issued1997-
dc.identifier.citationDifferences in serological IgA responses to recombinant baculovirus-derived human papillomavirus E2 protein in the natural history of cervical neoplasia. 1997, 75 (8):1144-50 Br. J. Canceren
dc.identifier.issn0007-0920-
dc.identifier.pmid9099962-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10541/95179-
dc.description.abstractInfection with certain types of human papillomavirus (HPV) presents a high risk for the subsequent development of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) and cervical carcinoma. Immunological mechanisms are likely to play a role in control of cervical HPV lesions. The HPV E2 protein has roles in virus replication and transcription, and loss of E2 functions may be associated with progression of cervical neoplasia. Accordingly, it is of interest to monitor immune responses to the E2 protein, and previous studies have reported associations between serological reactivity to E2 peptide antigens and cervical neoplasia. In order to investigate serological responses to native, full-length E2 protein, we expressed HPV-16 E2 proteins with and without an N-terminal polyhistidine tag using the baculovirus system. Purified HPV-16 E2 protein was used to develop enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays to detect serological IgG and IgA responses in cervical neoplasia patients and controls. We found that serum IgA levels against the E2 protein were elevated in CIN patients relative to normal control subjects but were not elevated in cervical cancer patients. Moreover, there appeared to be a gradient of response within cervical neoplasia such that the highest antibody levels were seen in lower grades of neoplasia up to CIN 2, whereas lower levels were observed in CIN 3 and still lower levels in cervical carcinoma. These findings suggest that the IgA antibody response to E2 may associate with stage and progression in cervical neoplasia.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.subjectUterine Cervical Canceren
dc.subject.meshAdult-
dc.subject.meshAged-
dc.subject.meshAntibodies, Viral-
dc.subject.meshBaculoviridae-
dc.subject.meshCarcinoma-
dc.subject.meshChromatography, Affinity-
dc.subject.meshDNA Primers-
dc.subject.meshDNA-Binding Proteins-
dc.subject.meshElectrophoresis, Polyacrylamide Gel-
dc.subject.meshEnzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay-
dc.subject.meshFemale-
dc.subject.meshGenetic Vectors-
dc.subject.meshHumans-
dc.subject.meshImmunoglobulin A-
dc.subject.meshImmunoglobulin G-
dc.subject.meshMiddle Aged-
dc.subject.meshOncogene Proteins, Viral-
dc.subject.meshPapillomaviridae-
dc.subject.meshProtein-Tyrosine Kinases-
dc.subject.meshRecombinant Proteins-
dc.subject.meshUterine Cervical Neoplasms-
dc.titleDifferences in serological IgA responses to recombinant baculovirus-derived human papillomavirus E2 protein in the natural history of cervical neoplasia.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Molecular Biology, Paterson Institute for Cancer Research, Christie Hospital NHS Trust, Manchester, UK.en
dc.identifier.journalBritish Journal of Canceren

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