Primary prostatic epithelial cell binding to human bone marrow stroma and the role of alpha2beta1 integrin.

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10541/94877
Title:
Primary prostatic epithelial cell binding to human bone marrow stroma and the role of alpha2beta1 integrin.
Authors:
Lang, Shona H; Clarke, Noel W ( 0000-0001-7776-8059 ) ; George, Nicholas J; Testa, Nydia G
Abstract:
Prostate cancer selectively metastasises to the bone. To investigate the importance of prostate epithelial cell adhesion to bone marrow cells in this process we examined the binding of human primary prostatic epithelial cells (PEC) to human bone marrow stromal cultures (BMS). We found that PEC derived from both malignant and benign tissue showed greater adhesion to BMS than to benign prostatic fibroblasts (median difference was 340% and 200% respectively), skin fibroblasts or plastic tissue culture plates. Adhesion to BMS grown from the bone marrow of patients with prostatic skeletal metastases was no different from those grown from normal bone marrow. The role of integrin molecules in these cell interactions was determined. Collagen type I and fibronectin were found to increase PEC adhesion whereas vitronectin and laminin did not. Inhibition studies demonstrated that although there was heterogeneity between samples, antibodies against the integrins alpha2 and beta1 consistently inhibited PEC binding to BMS. This result was more marked for PEC derived from malignant tissue. However studies investigating the effects of disintegrins and anti-alpha3 and anti-alpha5 integrins indicated that for a percentage of patients these integrins and RGD (arginine, glycine, aspartamine)-dependent binding pathways were also involved. In summary, the results indicate that BMS are adherent to primary PEC derived from both malignant and benign tissue. The integrin alpha2beta1 is a major contributor to this interaction.
Affiliation:
CRC Department of Experimental Haematology, Paterson Institute for Cancer Research, Christie Hospital NHS Trust, Manchester, UK. exhshl.picr.cr.ac.uk.
Citation:
Primary prostatic epithelial cell binding to human bone marrow stroma and the role of alpha2beta1 integrin. 1997, 15 (3):218-27 Clin. Exp. Metastasis
Journal:
Clinical & Experimental Metastasis
Issue Date:
May-1997
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10541/94877
DOI:
10.1023/A:1018465213641
PubMed ID:
9174123
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
0262-0898
Appears in Collections:
All Christie Publications ; All Paterson Institute for Cancer Research

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorLang, Shona Hen
dc.contributor.authorClarke, Noel Wen
dc.contributor.authorGeorge, Nicholas Jen
dc.contributor.authorTesta, Nydia Gen
dc.date.accessioned2010-03-24T14:18:16Z-
dc.date.available2010-03-24T14:18:16Z-
dc.date.issued1997-05-
dc.identifier.citationPrimary prostatic epithelial cell binding to human bone marrow stroma and the role of alpha2beta1 integrin. 1997, 15 (3):218-27 Clin. Exp. Metastasisen
dc.identifier.issn0262-0898-
dc.identifier.pmid9174123-
dc.identifier.doi10.1023/A:1018465213641-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10541/94877-
dc.description.abstractProstate cancer selectively metastasises to the bone. To investigate the importance of prostate epithelial cell adhesion to bone marrow cells in this process we examined the binding of human primary prostatic epithelial cells (PEC) to human bone marrow stromal cultures (BMS). We found that PEC derived from both malignant and benign tissue showed greater adhesion to BMS than to benign prostatic fibroblasts (median difference was 340% and 200% respectively), skin fibroblasts or plastic tissue culture plates. Adhesion to BMS grown from the bone marrow of patients with prostatic skeletal metastases was no different from those grown from normal bone marrow. The role of integrin molecules in these cell interactions was determined. Collagen type I and fibronectin were found to increase PEC adhesion whereas vitronectin and laminin did not. Inhibition studies demonstrated that although there was heterogeneity between samples, antibodies against the integrins alpha2 and beta1 consistently inhibited PEC binding to BMS. This result was more marked for PEC derived from malignant tissue. However studies investigating the effects of disintegrins and anti-alpha3 and anti-alpha5 integrins indicated that for a percentage of patients these integrins and RGD (arginine, glycine, aspartamine)-dependent binding pathways were also involved. In summary, the results indicate that BMS are adherent to primary PEC derived from both malignant and benign tissue. The integrin alpha2beta1 is a major contributor to this interaction.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.subjectProstatic Canceren
dc.subject.meshAnimals-
dc.subject.meshAntibodies, Monoclonal-
dc.subject.meshBone Marrow-
dc.subject.meshCell Adhesion-
dc.subject.meshCulture Techniques-
dc.subject.meshEpithelium-
dc.subject.meshExtracellular Matrix Proteins-
dc.subject.meshHumans-
dc.subject.meshIntegrins-
dc.subject.meshMale-
dc.subject.meshMice-
dc.subject.meshPeptides-
dc.subject.meshProstatic Neoplasms-
dc.subject.meshRabbits-
dc.subject.meshReceptors, Collagen-
dc.subject.meshStromal Cells-
dc.titlePrimary prostatic epithelial cell binding to human bone marrow stroma and the role of alpha2beta1 integrin.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentCRC Department of Experimental Haematology, Paterson Institute for Cancer Research, Christie Hospital NHS Trust, Manchester, UK. exhshl.picr.cr.ac.uk.en
dc.identifier.journalClinical & Experimental Metastasisen

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