What is the value of the lateral chest radiograph in the follow-up thoracic lymphoma?

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10541/94803
Title:
What is the value of the lateral chest radiograph in the follow-up thoracic lymphoma?
Authors:
Dobson, M J; Carrington, Bernadette M; Parsons, V J; Lo, F; Coffey, J; Ryder, W David J; Collins, Conor D
Abstract:
Lateral chest radiography in the investigation of thoracic lymphoma remains a feature of the current literature. This study assessed what information the lateral chest radiograph (CXR) adds in the follow-up of such patients. Eighty-eight patients with known lymphoma who had a CXR and thoracic CT within the same 4-week period were assessed. Five radiologists scored eight mediastinal and hilar nodal groups and eight extramediastinal regions on the frontal CXR as normal, equivocal or definitely abnormal (denoted 0, 1 and 2, respectively). This was repeated 1 week later with a combination of frontal and lateral films. Results were compared with the findings on CT which were scored similarly using accepted criteria for the presence of lymphadenopathy. Where the lateral CXR caused a change in score at any site, this change was compared with CT to determine the effect on diagnostic accuracy. For four of the five observers, the lateral film made no significant difference in diagnostic accuracy in the assessment of mediastinal lymph nodes. A fifth observer derived a small benefit from the addition of the lateral film, although almost 30 % of this was accounted for by changing from a wrong to an equivocal diagnosis. The lateral film did cause a small increase in the detection of pleuro-parenchymal lung lesions, although none of these were clinically significant. We conclude that routine lateral chest radiography is unhelpful in the follow-up of patients with lymphoma.
Affiliation:
Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Christie Hospital NHS Trust, Withington, Manchester M20 9BX, UK.
Citation:
What is the value of the lateral chest radiograph in the follow-up thoracic lymphoma? 1997, 7 (7):1110-3 Eur Radiol
Journal:
European Radiology
Issue Date:
1997
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10541/94803
DOI:
10.1007/s003300050263
PubMed ID:
9265685
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
0938-7994
Appears in Collections:
All Christie Publications

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorDobson, M Jen
dc.contributor.authorCarrington, Bernadette Men
dc.contributor.authorParsons, V Jen
dc.contributor.authorLo, Fen
dc.contributor.authorCoffey, Jen
dc.contributor.authorRyder, W David Jen
dc.contributor.authorCollins, Conor Den
dc.date.accessioned2010-03-24T13:16:27Z-
dc.date.available2010-03-24T13:16:27Z-
dc.date.issued1997-
dc.identifier.citationWhat is the value of the lateral chest radiograph in the follow-up thoracic lymphoma? 1997, 7 (7):1110-3 Eur Radiolen
dc.identifier.issn0938-7994-
dc.identifier.pmid9265685-
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s003300050263-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10541/94803-
dc.description.abstractLateral chest radiography in the investigation of thoracic lymphoma remains a feature of the current literature. This study assessed what information the lateral chest radiograph (CXR) adds in the follow-up of such patients. Eighty-eight patients with known lymphoma who had a CXR and thoracic CT within the same 4-week period were assessed. Five radiologists scored eight mediastinal and hilar nodal groups and eight extramediastinal regions on the frontal CXR as normal, equivocal or definitely abnormal (denoted 0, 1 and 2, respectively). This was repeated 1 week later with a combination of frontal and lateral films. Results were compared with the findings on CT which were scored similarly using accepted criteria for the presence of lymphadenopathy. Where the lateral CXR caused a change in score at any site, this change was compared with CT to determine the effect on diagnostic accuracy. For four of the five observers, the lateral film made no significant difference in diagnostic accuracy in the assessment of mediastinal lymph nodes. A fifth observer derived a small benefit from the addition of the lateral film, although almost 30 % of this was accounted for by changing from a wrong to an equivocal diagnosis. The lateral film did cause a small increase in the detection of pleuro-parenchymal lung lesions, although none of these were clinically significant. We conclude that routine lateral chest radiography is unhelpful in the follow-up of patients with lymphoma.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.subjectThoracic Canceren
dc.subject.meshAdult-
dc.subject.meshHumans-
dc.subject.meshLymph Nodes-
dc.subject.meshLymphoma-
dc.subject.meshObserver Variation-
dc.subject.meshRadiography, Thoracic-
dc.subject.meshThoracic Neoplasms-
dc.subject.meshTomography, X-Ray Computed-
dc.titleWhat is the value of the lateral chest radiograph in the follow-up thoracic lymphoma?en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Diagnostic Radiology, Christie Hospital NHS Trust, Withington, Manchester M20 9BX, UK.en
dc.identifier.journalEuropean Radiologyen

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