Visibility of microcalcifications in computed and screen-film mammography.

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10541/94701
Title:
Visibility of microcalcifications in computed and screen-film mammography.
Authors:
Cowen, A R; Launders, J H; Jadav, M; Brettle, David S
Abstract:
Due to the clinically and technically demanding nature of breast x-ray imaging, mammography still remains one of the few essentially film-based radiological imaging techniques in modern medical imaging. There are a range of possible benefits available if a practical and economical direct digital imaging technique can be introduced to routine clinical practice. There has been much debate regarding the minimum specification required for direct digital acquisition. One such direct digital system available is computed radiography (CR), which has a modest specification when compared with modern screen-film mammography (SFM) systems. This paper details two psychophysical studies in which the detection of simulated microcalcifications with CR has been directly compared to that with SFM. The first study found that under scatter-free conditions the minimum detectable size of microcalcification was approximately 130 microns for both SFM and CR. The second study found that SFM had a 4.6% higher probability of observers being able to correctly identify the shape of 350 microns diameter test details; there was no significant difference for-either larger or smaller test details. From the results of these studies it has been demonstrated that the modest specification of CR, in terms of limiting resolution, does not translate into a dramatic difference in the perception of details at the limit of detectability. When judging the imaging performance of a system it is more important to compare the signal-to-noise ratio transfer spectrum characteristics, rather than simply the modulation transfer function.
Affiliation:
LXi Research and FAXiL, University of Leeds Research School of Medicine, West Yorkshire, UK.
Citation:
Visibility of microcalcifications in computed and screen-film mammography. 1997, 42 (8):1533-48 Phys Med Biol
Journal:
Physics in Medicine and Biology
Issue Date:
Aug-1997
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10541/94701
DOI:
10.1088/0031-9155/42/8/005
PubMed ID:
9279904
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
0031-9155
Appears in Collections:
All Christie Publications

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorCowen, A Ren
dc.contributor.authorLaunders, J Hen
dc.contributor.authorJadav, Men
dc.contributor.authorBrettle, David Sen
dc.date.accessioned2010-03-23T14:44:02Z-
dc.date.available2010-03-23T14:44:02Z-
dc.date.issued1997-08-
dc.identifier.citationVisibility of microcalcifications in computed and screen-film mammography. 1997, 42 (8):1533-48 Phys Med Biolen
dc.identifier.issn0031-9155-
dc.identifier.pmid9279904-
dc.identifier.doi10.1088/0031-9155/42/8/005-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10541/94701-
dc.description.abstractDue to the clinically and technically demanding nature of breast x-ray imaging, mammography still remains one of the few essentially film-based radiological imaging techniques in modern medical imaging. There are a range of possible benefits available if a practical and economical direct digital imaging technique can be introduced to routine clinical practice. There has been much debate regarding the minimum specification required for direct digital acquisition. One such direct digital system available is computed radiography (CR), which has a modest specification when compared with modern screen-film mammography (SFM) systems. This paper details two psychophysical studies in which the detection of simulated microcalcifications with CR has been directly compared to that with SFM. The first study found that under scatter-free conditions the minimum detectable size of microcalcification was approximately 130 microns for both SFM and CR. The second study found that SFM had a 4.6% higher probability of observers being able to correctly identify the shape of 350 microns diameter test details; there was no significant difference for-either larger or smaller test details. From the results of these studies it has been demonstrated that the modest specification of CR, in terms of limiting resolution, does not translate into a dramatic difference in the perception of details at the limit of detectability. When judging the imaging performance of a system it is more important to compare the signal-to-noise ratio transfer spectrum characteristics, rather than simply the modulation transfer function.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.subject.meshBreast Diseases-
dc.subject.meshCalcinosis-
dc.subject.meshFemale-
dc.subject.meshHumans-
dc.subject.meshMammography-
dc.subject.meshPhantoms, Imaging-
dc.subject.meshRadiographic Image Interpretation, Computer-Assisted-
dc.subject.meshReproducibility of Results-
dc.subject.meshSensitivity and Specificity-
dc.titleVisibility of microcalcifications in computed and screen-film mammography.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentLXi Research and FAXiL, University of Leeds Research School of Medicine, West Yorkshire, UK.en
dc.identifier.journalPhysics in Medicine and Biologyen

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