Disclosure of concerns by hospice patients and their identification by nurses.

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10541/94692
Title:
Disclosure of concerns by hospice patients and their identification by nurses.
Authors:
Heaven, Cathy; Maguire, Peter
Abstract:
As part of an evaluation of the training of hospice nurses in communication skills, the selectivity of patients in disclosing their concerns and the ability of nurses to register all the concerns disclosed were studied. Forty-two nurses were recruited from two hospices in the north of England. They were asked to determine and write down patients' current concerns before and after training, and nine months later. Their interviews were tape recorded to permit rating of the concerns disclosed. After each interview a research nurse used a semistructured interview and the Concerns Checklist to elicit patients' concerns. The Spielberger State Anxiety Scale and Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale were then administered to assess patients' mood. In total, 87 patients were thus assessed. Patients were highly selective in what they disclosed and showed a strong bias towards disclosing physical symptoms. Overall, 60% of concerns remained hidden and concerns about the future, appearance and loss of independence were withheld more than 80% of the time. Patients who were more anxious or depressed were less likely to disclose concerns. The nurses registered only 40% of the concerns disclosed to them at interview, and less than 20% of patients' concerns were identified appropriately. The nurses were selective in the categories of concerns that they registered. Pain, family worries, appetite and weight loss, nausea and vomiting were noted most frequently, while concerns about cancer, bowel function, treatment and emotional worries were not registered. The patients' main concern was identified and recorded in only 45% of cases. Overall, it was found that hospice patients selectively disclosed physical symptoms while nurses did not elicit or register patients' concerns accurately. Nurses therefore need to improve their ability to elicit and register all of their patients' concerns and to pay particular attention to those who are anxious and depressed.
Affiliation:
CRC Psychological Medicine Group, Christie Hospital, Manchester, UK.
Citation:
Disclosure of concerns by hospice patients and their identification by nurses. 1997, 11 (4):283-90 Palliat Med
Journal:
Palliative Medicine
Issue Date:
Jul-1997
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10541/94692
PubMed ID:
9373579
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
0269-2163
Appears in Collections:
All Christie Publications

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorHeaven, Cathyen
dc.contributor.authorMaguire, Peteren
dc.date.accessioned2010-03-23T15:16:56Z-
dc.date.available2010-03-23T15:16:56Z-
dc.date.issued1997-07-
dc.identifier.citationDisclosure of concerns by hospice patients and their identification by nurses. 1997, 11 (4):283-90 Palliat Meden
dc.identifier.issn0269-2163-
dc.identifier.pmid9373579-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10541/94692-
dc.description.abstractAs part of an evaluation of the training of hospice nurses in communication skills, the selectivity of patients in disclosing their concerns and the ability of nurses to register all the concerns disclosed were studied. Forty-two nurses were recruited from two hospices in the north of England. They were asked to determine and write down patients' current concerns before and after training, and nine months later. Their interviews were tape recorded to permit rating of the concerns disclosed. After each interview a research nurse used a semistructured interview and the Concerns Checklist to elicit patients' concerns. The Spielberger State Anxiety Scale and Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale were then administered to assess patients' mood. In total, 87 patients were thus assessed. Patients were highly selective in what they disclosed and showed a strong bias towards disclosing physical symptoms. Overall, 60% of concerns remained hidden and concerns about the future, appearance and loss of independence were withheld more than 80% of the time. Patients who were more anxious or depressed were less likely to disclose concerns. The nurses registered only 40% of the concerns disclosed to them at interview, and less than 20% of patients' concerns were identified appropriately. The nurses were selective in the categories of concerns that they registered. Pain, family worries, appetite and weight loss, nausea and vomiting were noted most frequently, while concerns about cancer, bowel function, treatment and emotional worries were not registered. The patients' main concern was identified and recorded in only 45% of cases. Overall, it was found that hospice patients selectively disclosed physical symptoms while nurses did not elicit or register patients' concerns accurately. Nurses therefore need to improve their ability to elicit and register all of their patients' concerns and to pay particular attention to those who are anxious and depressed.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.subject.meshAnxiety-
dc.subject.meshCommunication-
dc.subject.meshEngland-
dc.subject.meshFemale-
dc.subject.meshHospice Care-
dc.subject.meshHumans-
dc.subject.meshNurse-Patient Relations-
dc.subject.meshNursing Assessment-
dc.subject.meshNursing Audit-
dc.subject.meshSelf Disclosure-
dc.titleDisclosure of concerns by hospice patients and their identification by nurses.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentCRC Psychological Medicine Group, Christie Hospital, Manchester, UK.en
dc.identifier.journalPalliative Medicineen

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