2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10541/92023
Title:
The intrinsic radiosensitivity of normal and tumour cells.
Authors:
West, Catharine M L; Davidson, Susan E; Elyan, S A; Swindell, Ric; Roberts, Stephen A; Orton, C J; Coyle, C A; Valentine, Helen R; Wilks, Deepti P; Hunter, Robin D; Hendry, Jolyon H
Abstract:
PURPOSE: To examine whether in vitro measurements of normal and tumour cell radiosensitivity can be used as prognostic factors in clinical oncology. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Stage I-III cervix carcinoma patients were treated with radical radiotherapy with a minimum of 3 years' follow-up. Lymphocyte and tumour radiosensitivities were assayed using, respectively, a limiting dilution and soft agar clonogenic assay to obtain surviving fraction at 2 Gy (SF2). The results were related, in an actuarial analysis, to late morbidity assessed using the Franco Italian glossary. RESULTS: Patients with radiosensitive lymphocytes had a significantly increased risk of developing late complications (n = 93, p = 0.002). Increasing tumour radiosensitivity was associated with an increased risk of morbidity (n= 113, p=0.032). A significant correlation was found between fibroblast and tumour cell radiosensitivity (r=0.57, p=0.03), but a weak inverse association was found between lymphocyte and tumour cell radiosensitivity (r= -0.32, p=0.03). Patients with radiosensitive lymphocytes and tumour cells had higher levels of late complications than those whose cells were radioresistant. CONCLUSION: The work described highlights the importance of cellular radiosensitivity as a parameter determining the clinical response to radiotherapy.
Affiliation:
CRC Sections of Genome Damage and Repair, Paterson Institute for Cancer Research, Manchester, UK.
Citation:
The intrinsic radiosensitivity of normal and tumour cells. 1998, 73 (4):409-13 Int. J. Radiat. Biol.
Journal:
International Journal of Radiation Biology
Issue Date:
Apr-1998
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10541/92023
PubMed ID:
9587079
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
0955-3002
Appears in Collections:
All Christie Publications ; All Paterson Institute for Cancer Research

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorWest, Catharine M Len
dc.contributor.authorDavidson, Susan Een
dc.contributor.authorElyan, S Aen
dc.contributor.authorSwindell, Ricen
dc.contributor.authorRoberts, Stephen Aen
dc.contributor.authorOrton, C Jen
dc.contributor.authorCoyle, C Aen
dc.contributor.authorValentine, Helen Ren
dc.contributor.authorWilks, Deepti Pen
dc.contributor.authorHunter, Robin Den
dc.contributor.authorHendry, Jolyon Hen
dc.date.accessioned2010-02-12T15:45:35Z-
dc.date.available2010-02-12T15:45:35Z-
dc.date.issued1998-04-
dc.identifier.citationThe intrinsic radiosensitivity of normal and tumour cells. 1998, 73 (4):409-13 Int. J. Radiat. Biol.en
dc.identifier.issn0955-3002-
dc.identifier.pmid9587079-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10541/92023-
dc.description.abstractPURPOSE: To examine whether in vitro measurements of normal and tumour cell radiosensitivity can be used as prognostic factors in clinical oncology. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Stage I-III cervix carcinoma patients were treated with radical radiotherapy with a minimum of 3 years' follow-up. Lymphocyte and tumour radiosensitivities were assayed using, respectively, a limiting dilution and soft agar clonogenic assay to obtain surviving fraction at 2 Gy (SF2). The results were related, in an actuarial analysis, to late morbidity assessed using the Franco Italian glossary. RESULTS: Patients with radiosensitive lymphocytes had a significantly increased risk of developing late complications (n = 93, p = 0.002). Increasing tumour radiosensitivity was associated with an increased risk of morbidity (n= 113, p=0.032). A significant correlation was found between fibroblast and tumour cell radiosensitivity (r=0.57, p=0.03), but a weak inverse association was found between lymphocyte and tumour cell radiosensitivity (r= -0.32, p=0.03). Patients with radiosensitive lymphocytes and tumour cells had higher levels of late complications than those whose cells were radioresistant. CONCLUSION: The work described highlights the importance of cellular radiosensitivity as a parameter determining the clinical response to radiotherapy.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.subjectCancer Stagingen
dc.subjectUterine Cervical Canceren
dc.subject.meshCarcinoma-
dc.subject.meshColony-Forming Units Assay-
dc.subject.meshFemale-
dc.subject.meshFibroblasts-
dc.subject.meshHumans-
dc.subject.meshLymphocytes-
dc.subject.meshNeoplasm Staging-
dc.subject.meshRadiation Tolerance-
dc.subject.meshSurvival Analysis-
dc.subject.meshUterine Cervical Neoplasms-
dc.titleThe intrinsic radiosensitivity of normal and tumour cells.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentCRC Sections of Genome Damage and Repair, Paterson Institute for Cancer Research, Manchester, UK.en
dc.identifier.journalInternational Journal of Radiation Biologyen

Related articles on PubMed

All Items in Christie are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.