2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10541/91668
Title:
Conflicts with the somatopause.
Authors:
Toogood, Andy; Shalet, Stephen M
Abstract:
Secretion of growth hormone (GH) falls with increasing age, and early studies of GH secretion in elderly patients suggested that secretion may cease in a proportion of adults aged over 60 years. In order to determine whether organic disease of the hypothalamic-pituitary axis in adults aged over 60 years results in GH deficiency distinct from the age-related decline in GH secretion, studies were performed in subjects aged 61-88 years. GH secretion in patients with GH deficiency was reduced by 90% compared with controls. Serum insulin-like growth factor-I levels in patients with organic GH deficiency were significantly reduced compared with normal data, but only 17% had concentrations below the lower limit of the normal range. Although levels of IGF binding protein-3 in patients were lower when compared with normal data, all were within the normal range. There was a significant increase in fat mass in patients with GH deficiency compared with healthy controls. Unlike younger adults with GH deficiency, no significant reduction in lean mass was demonstrated in adults with GH deficiency aged over 60 years. Serum osteocalcin and deoxypyridinoline excretion were significantly reduced in patients with GH deficiency, suggesting a reduction in bone turnover. Despite this, total body bone mineral content and bone mineral density in the hip and spine were not reduced compared with controls. In conclusion, organic disease of the hypothalamic-pituitary axis in adults aged over 60 years results in GH deficiency distinct from the age-related decline in GH secretion.
Affiliation:
Department of Endocrinology, Christie Hospital NHS Trust, Manchester, UK.
Citation:
Conflicts with the somatopause. 1998, 8 Suppl A:47-54 Growth Horm. IGF Res.
Journal:
Growth Hormone & IGF Research
Issue Date:
Feb-1998
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10541/91668
DOI:
10.1016/S1096-6374(98)80009-9
PubMed ID:
10993591
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
1096-6374
Appears in Collections:
All Christie Publications

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorToogood, Andyen
dc.contributor.authorShalet, Stephen Men
dc.date.accessioned2010-02-09T16:57:44Z-
dc.date.available2010-02-09T16:57:44Z-
dc.date.issued1998-02-
dc.identifier.citationConflicts with the somatopause. 1998, 8 Suppl A:47-54 Growth Horm. IGF Res.en
dc.identifier.issn1096-6374-
dc.identifier.pmid10993591-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/S1096-6374(98)80009-9-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10541/91668-
dc.description.abstractSecretion of growth hormone (GH) falls with increasing age, and early studies of GH secretion in elderly patients suggested that secretion may cease in a proportion of adults aged over 60 years. In order to determine whether organic disease of the hypothalamic-pituitary axis in adults aged over 60 years results in GH deficiency distinct from the age-related decline in GH secretion, studies were performed in subjects aged 61-88 years. GH secretion in patients with GH deficiency was reduced by 90% compared with controls. Serum insulin-like growth factor-I levels in patients with organic GH deficiency were significantly reduced compared with normal data, but only 17% had concentrations below the lower limit of the normal range. Although levels of IGF binding protein-3 in patients were lower when compared with normal data, all were within the normal range. There was a significant increase in fat mass in patients with GH deficiency compared with healthy controls. Unlike younger adults with GH deficiency, no significant reduction in lean mass was demonstrated in adults with GH deficiency aged over 60 years. Serum osteocalcin and deoxypyridinoline excretion were significantly reduced in patients with GH deficiency, suggesting a reduction in bone turnover. Despite this, total body bone mineral content and bone mineral density in the hip and spine were not reduced compared with controls. In conclusion, organic disease of the hypothalamic-pituitary axis in adults aged over 60 years results in GH deficiency distinct from the age-related decline in GH secretion.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.subject.meshAdipose Tissue-
dc.subject.meshAge Factors-
dc.subject.meshAged-
dc.subject.meshAged, 80 and over-
dc.subject.meshAmino Acids-
dc.subject.meshBone Density-
dc.subject.meshCase-Control Studies-
dc.subject.meshFemale-
dc.subject.meshHuman Growth Hormone-
dc.subject.meshHumans-
dc.subject.meshInsulin-Like Growth Factor Binding Protein 3-
dc.subject.meshInsulin-Like Growth Factor I-
dc.subject.meshMale-
dc.subject.meshMiddle Aged-
dc.subject.meshOsteocalcin-
dc.subject.meshRadioimmunoassay-
dc.titleConflicts with the somatopause.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Endocrinology, Christie Hospital NHS Trust, Manchester, UK.en
dc.identifier.journalGrowth Hormone & IGF Researchen

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