An interstitial light assembly for photodynamic therapy in prostatic carcinoma.

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10541/91419
Title:
An interstitial light assembly for photodynamic therapy in prostatic carcinoma.
Authors:
Lee, L K; Whitehurst, Colin; Pantelides, M L; Moore, James V
Abstract:
OBJECTIVE: To develop an interstitial laser light delivery system using multiple optical fibres for photodynamic therapy (PDT) in the treatment of prostate cancer. PATIENTS AND METHODS: A laser beam was divided equally with a 1 x 4 fibre splitter to deliver PDT simultaneously through four 2-cm long, flexible cylindrical optical diffusers. Biplanar transrectal ultrasonography (TRUS) and a template were used to position the optical fibres percutaneously. In vivo measurements of light penetration depth (1/micro[eff] ) in prostate tissue were made in seven patients, using a sheathed isoprobe to measure light fluence rates at varying radial distances from the diffuser. The prostate was fixed with stabilization needles to minimize displacement during needle placement. RESULTS: The mean (sd, range) micro(eff) in the prostates of the seven patients was 0.35 (0.07, 0.22-0.44) mm-1, which produced closely parallel slopes of light attenuation. However, there was up to a 10-fold variation in absolute light levels at the same diffuser-detector separation distances amongst the seven patients, probably caused by blood pooling around the diffuser light source. A similar problem around the isoprobe detector was overcome by sheathing the probe in clear plastic tubing. By stabilizing the prostate, the optical fibre positioning was precise to within 2 mm. CONCLUSION: Although this light delivery and TRUS assembly were developed for clinical PDT in the prostate, the same instrumentation can be used reliably for in vivo light-penetration studies. Haemorrhage was unpredictable and highlighted one of the main problems which needs to be overcome.
Affiliation:
Laser Oncology Programme, CRC Department of Experimental Radiation Oncology, Paterson Institute for Cancer Research, Christie Hospital NHS Trust, Manchester, UK.
Citation:
An interstitial light assembly for photodynamic therapy in prostatic carcinoma. 1999, 84 (7):821-6 BJU Int.
Journal:
BJU International
Issue Date:
Nov-1999
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10541/91419
DOI:
10.1046/j.1464-410x.1999.00314.x
PubMed ID:
10532979
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
1464-4096
Appears in Collections:
All Paterson Institute for Cancer Research

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorLee, L Ken
dc.contributor.authorWhitehurst, Colinen
dc.contributor.authorPantelides, M Len
dc.contributor.authorMoore, James Ven
dc.date.accessioned2010-02-08T15:40:36Z-
dc.date.available2010-02-08T15:40:36Z-
dc.date.issued1999-11-
dc.identifier.citationAn interstitial light assembly for photodynamic therapy in prostatic carcinoma. 1999, 84 (7):821-6 BJU Int.en
dc.identifier.issn1464-4096-
dc.identifier.pmid10532979-
dc.identifier.doi10.1046/j.1464-410x.1999.00314.x-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10541/91419-
dc.description.abstractOBJECTIVE: To develop an interstitial laser light delivery system using multiple optical fibres for photodynamic therapy (PDT) in the treatment of prostate cancer. PATIENTS AND METHODS: A laser beam was divided equally with a 1 x 4 fibre splitter to deliver PDT simultaneously through four 2-cm long, flexible cylindrical optical diffusers. Biplanar transrectal ultrasonography (TRUS) and a template were used to position the optical fibres percutaneously. In vivo measurements of light penetration depth (1/micro[eff] ) in prostate tissue were made in seven patients, using a sheathed isoprobe to measure light fluence rates at varying radial distances from the diffuser. The prostate was fixed with stabilization needles to minimize displacement during needle placement. RESULTS: The mean (sd, range) micro(eff) in the prostates of the seven patients was 0.35 (0.07, 0.22-0.44) mm-1, which produced closely parallel slopes of light attenuation. However, there was up to a 10-fold variation in absolute light levels at the same diffuser-detector separation distances amongst the seven patients, probably caused by blood pooling around the diffuser light source. A similar problem around the isoprobe detector was overcome by sheathing the probe in clear plastic tubing. By stabilizing the prostate, the optical fibre positioning was precise to within 2 mm. CONCLUSION: Although this light delivery and TRUS assembly were developed for clinical PDT in the prostate, the same instrumentation can be used reliably for in vivo light-penetration studies. Haemorrhage was unpredictable and highlighted one of the main problems which needs to be overcome.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.subjectProstatic Canceren
dc.subject.meshAged-
dc.subject.meshEquipment Design-
dc.subject.meshFiber Optic Technology-
dc.subject.meshHumans-
dc.subject.meshLaser Therapy-
dc.subject.meshMale-
dc.subject.meshNeedles-
dc.subject.meshPhotochemotherapy-
dc.subject.meshProstatic Neoplasms-
dc.titleAn interstitial light assembly for photodynamic therapy in prostatic carcinoma.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentLaser Oncology Programme, CRC Department of Experimental Radiation Oncology, Paterson Institute for Cancer Research, Christie Hospital NHS Trust, Manchester, UK.en
dc.identifier.journalBJU Internationalen

Related articles on PubMed

All Items in Christie are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.