Temporal change in microdosimetry to bone marrow and stromal progenitor cells from alpha-particle-emitting radionuclides incorporated in bone.

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10541/91388
Title:
Temporal change in microdosimetry to bone marrow and stromal progenitor cells from alpha-particle-emitting radionuclides incorporated in bone.
Authors:
Austin, Amanda L; Ellender, Michele; Haines, Jackie W; Harrison, John D; Lord, Brian I
Abstract:
The microdistributions of the alpha-particle-emitting bone surface-seeking radionuclides (239)Pu, (241)Am and (233)U in the mouse femoral shaft have been studied using computer-based image analysis of neutron-induced and alpha-particle track autoradiographs, prepared from femora of CBA/H mice which had been injected with 40 kBq kg(-1) of radionuclide (as citrate solution) at times from 1 to 448 days previously. Employing dosimetric methods, radiation dose rates and cumulative radiation doses to regions of the bone marrow thought to contain hemopoietic and stromal progenitor cells susceptible to neoplastic transformation to leukemia and osteosarcomas have been calculated. It has been shown that the three radionuclides differ in their relative deposition on the bone surfaces, and that patterns of changing redistribution with time are also varied. For stromal progenitor cells, which are thought to be targets for induction of osteosarcoma and are found in proximity to the bone surfaces, cumulative doses showed the trend (239)Pu > (241)Am > (233)U, correlating well with incidences of osteosarcoma observed in mice. Cumulative doses to the primitive hemopoietic stem cells, concentrated in the central marrow and thought to be susceptible to neoplastic transformation to myeloid leukemia, were considerably lower and also showed the trend plutonium > americium > uranium.
Affiliation:
CRC Section of Haemopoietic Cell and Gene Therapeutics, Paterson Institute for Cancer Research, Christie Hospital NHS Trust, Wilmslow Road, Manchester, M20 4BX, United Kingdom.
Citation:
Temporal change in microdosimetry to bone marrow and stromal progenitor cells from alpha-particle-emitting radionuclides incorporated in bone. 1999, 152 (6 Suppl):S38-42 Radiat. Res.
Journal:
Radiation Research
Issue Date:
Dec-1999
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10541/91388
PubMed ID:
10564934
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
0033-7587
Appears in Collections:
All Paterson Institute for Cancer Research

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorAustin, Amanda Len
dc.contributor.authorEllender, Micheleen
dc.contributor.authorHaines, Jackie Wen
dc.contributor.authorHarrison, John Den
dc.contributor.authorLord, Brian Ien
dc.date.accessioned2010-02-08T13:21:40Z-
dc.date.available2010-02-08T13:21:40Z-
dc.date.issued1999-12-
dc.identifier.citationTemporal change in microdosimetry to bone marrow and stromal progenitor cells from alpha-particle-emitting radionuclides incorporated in bone. 1999, 152 (6 Suppl):S38-42 Radiat. Res.en
dc.identifier.issn0033-7587-
dc.identifier.pmid10564934-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10541/91388-
dc.description.abstractThe microdistributions of the alpha-particle-emitting bone surface-seeking radionuclides (239)Pu, (241)Am and (233)U in the mouse femoral shaft have been studied using computer-based image analysis of neutron-induced and alpha-particle track autoradiographs, prepared from femora of CBA/H mice which had been injected with 40 kBq kg(-1) of radionuclide (as citrate solution) at times from 1 to 448 days previously. Employing dosimetric methods, radiation dose rates and cumulative radiation doses to regions of the bone marrow thought to contain hemopoietic and stromal progenitor cells susceptible to neoplastic transformation to leukemia and osteosarcomas have been calculated. It has been shown that the three radionuclides differ in their relative deposition on the bone surfaces, and that patterns of changing redistribution with time are also varied. For stromal progenitor cells, which are thought to be targets for induction of osteosarcoma and are found in proximity to the bone surfaces, cumulative doses showed the trend (239)Pu > (241)Am > (233)U, correlating well with incidences of osteosarcoma observed in mice. Cumulative doses to the primitive hemopoietic stem cells, concentrated in the central marrow and thought to be susceptible to neoplastic transformation to myeloid leukemia, were considerably lower and also showed the trend plutonium > americium > uranium.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.subjectHaematopoietic Stem Cellsen
dc.subject.meshAlpha Particles-
dc.subject.meshAnimals-
dc.subject.meshAutoradiography-
dc.subject.meshBone Marrow-
dc.subject.meshBone and Bones-
dc.subject.meshFemale-
dc.subject.meshHematopoietic Stem Cells-
dc.subject.meshMacrophages-
dc.subject.meshMale-
dc.subject.meshMice-
dc.subject.meshMice, Inbred DBA-
dc.subject.meshRadiation Dosage-
dc.subject.meshStromal Cells-
dc.titleTemporal change in microdosimetry to bone marrow and stromal progenitor cells from alpha-particle-emitting radionuclides incorporated in bone.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentCRC Section of Haemopoietic Cell and Gene Therapeutics, Paterson Institute for Cancer Research, Christie Hospital NHS Trust, Wilmslow Road, Manchester, M20 4BX, United Kingdom.en
dc.identifier.journalRadiation Researchen
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