Transgenerational susceptibility to leukaemia induction resulting from preconception, paternal irradiation.

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10541/91342
Title:
Transgenerational susceptibility to leukaemia induction resulting from preconception, paternal irradiation.
Authors:
Lord, Brian I
Abstract:
The clustered excess of childhood leukaemia and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma at Seascale, close to the nuclear reprocessing plant at Sellafield in the UK is well authenticated and has remained a 'current topic' for over a decade. Its root cause has not been established. Following a study suggesting that parental irradiation exposure prior to conception was a factor, a recent laboratory-based report reopened the debate by indicating the potential for preconception, paternal irradiation (PPI) to result in increased or accelerated induction of lympho-myeloid malignancy in offspring subjected to a recognized leukaemogen. This short commentary presents those new findings in the light of the many and diverse epidemiological investigations of first generation malignancies following parental exposure, the majority of which indicate no real evidence to support the concept that patterns of lympho-myeloid malignancy reflect levels of PPI. Other experimental work supporting PPI are considered against unsuccessful attempts to reproduce them. The alternative, and more popular, hypothesis of infection spread via population mixing, which is more ubiquitous than confinement to nuclear localities, is introduced. Mechanisms of potentiation by PPI are considered, though the danger of applying these current findings to explain the enigma of Seascale, or any other cluster, is recognized.
Affiliation:
CRC Section of Haemopoietic Cell and Gene Therapeutics, Paterson Institute for Cancer Research, Christie Hospital NHS Trust, Manchester, UK. blord@picr.man.ac.uk
Citation:
Transgenerational susceptibility to leukaemia induction resulting from preconception, paternal irradiation. 1999, 75 (7):801-10 Int. J. Radiat. Biol.
Journal:
International Journal of Radiation Biology
Issue Date:
Jul-1999
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10541/91342
PubMed ID:
10489891
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
0955-3002
Appears in Collections:
All Paterson Institute for Cancer Research

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorLord, Brian Ien
dc.date.accessioned2010-02-08T11:12:04Z-
dc.date.available2010-02-08T11:12:04Z-
dc.date.issued1999-07-
dc.identifier.citationTransgenerational susceptibility to leukaemia induction resulting from preconception, paternal irradiation. 1999, 75 (7):801-10 Int. J. Radiat. Biol.en
dc.identifier.issn0955-3002-
dc.identifier.pmid10489891-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10541/91342-
dc.description.abstractThe clustered excess of childhood leukaemia and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma at Seascale, close to the nuclear reprocessing plant at Sellafield in the UK is well authenticated and has remained a 'current topic' for over a decade. Its root cause has not been established. Following a study suggesting that parental irradiation exposure prior to conception was a factor, a recent laboratory-based report reopened the debate by indicating the potential for preconception, paternal irradiation (PPI) to result in increased or accelerated induction of lympho-myeloid malignancy in offspring subjected to a recognized leukaemogen. This short commentary presents those new findings in the light of the many and diverse epidemiological investigations of first generation malignancies following parental exposure, the majority of which indicate no real evidence to support the concept that patterns of lympho-myeloid malignancy reflect levels of PPI. Other experimental work supporting PPI are considered against unsuccessful attempts to reproduce them. The alternative, and more popular, hypothesis of infection spread via population mixing, which is more ubiquitous than confinement to nuclear localities, is introduced. Mechanisms of potentiation by PPI are considered, though the danger of applying these current findings to explain the enigma of Seascale, or any other cluster, is recognized.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.subjectLeukaemiaen
dc.subjectRadiation-Induced Leukaemiaen
dc.subjectRadiation-Induced Canceren
dc.subjectTumour Virus Infectionsen
dc.subject.meshAnimals-
dc.subject.meshChild-
dc.subject.meshCluster Analysis-
dc.subject.meshFathers-
dc.subject.meshFemale-
dc.subject.meshGreat Britain-
dc.subject.meshHumans-
dc.subject.meshLeukemia-
dc.subject.meshLeukemia, Radiation-Induced-
dc.subject.meshLymphoma, Non-Hodgkin-
dc.subject.meshMale-
dc.subject.meshModels, Biological-
dc.subject.meshNeoplasms, Radiation-Induced-
dc.subject.meshNuclear Warfare-
dc.subject.meshOccupational Exposure-
dc.subject.meshPopulation Dynamics-
dc.subject.meshPower Plants-
dc.subject.meshPregnancy-
dc.subject.meshRadiobiology-
dc.subject.meshTumor Virus Infections-
dc.titleTransgenerational susceptibility to leukaemia induction resulting from preconception, paternal irradiation.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentCRC Section of Haemopoietic Cell and Gene Therapeutics, Paterson Institute for Cancer Research, Christie Hospital NHS Trust, Manchester, UK. blord@picr.man.ac.uken
dc.identifier.journalInternational Journal of Radiation Biologyen

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