Epithelial stem cells in the mammary gland: casting light into dark corners.

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10541/90804
Title:
Epithelial stem cells in the mammary gland: casting light into dark corners.
Authors:
Anderson, Elizabeth; Clarke, Robert B
Abstract:
The epithelial structures of the human breast or the mouse mammary gland are derived from a relatively small number of multipotent, tissue-specific stem cells, of which we are surprisingly ignorant. We do not know how many are required to produce a complete mammary gland, how many times they divide during the process, where they are situated in the gland, or even what they look like. We want to know the answers to these questions, not just to satisfy intellectual curiosity, but also because the answers may shed light on the evolution of breast cancer. Now, studies carried out by Kordon and Smith at the National Cancer Institute have pointed the way toward a new understanding of mammary stem cells and their progeny.
Affiliation:
Tumour Biochemistry Laboratory, Clinical Research Department, Christie Hospital NHS Trust, Wilmslow Road, Manchester M20 4BX, England. EAnderson@picr.man.ac.uk
Citation:
Epithelial stem cells in the mammary gland: casting light into dark corners. 1999, 1 (1):11-3 Breast Cancer Res.
Journal:
Breast Cancer Research
Issue Date:
1999
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10541/90804
DOI:
doi.org/10.1186/bcr5
PubMed ID:
11250675
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
1465-5411
Appears in Collections:
All Paterson Institute for Cancer Research

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorAnderson, Elizabethen
dc.contributor.authorClarke, Robert Ben
dc.date.accessioned2010-01-28T12:19:01Z-
dc.date.available2010-01-28T12:19:01Z-
dc.date.issued1999-
dc.identifier.citationEpithelial stem cells in the mammary gland: casting light into dark corners. 1999, 1 (1):11-3 Breast Cancer Res.en
dc.identifier.issn1465-5411-
dc.identifier.pmid11250675-
dc.identifier.doidoi.org/10.1186/bcr5-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10541/90804-
dc.description.abstractThe epithelial structures of the human breast or the mouse mammary gland are derived from a relatively small number of multipotent, tissue-specific stem cells, of which we are surprisingly ignorant. We do not know how many are required to produce a complete mammary gland, how many times they divide during the process, where they are situated in the gland, or even what they look like. We want to know the answers to these questions, not just to satisfy intellectual curiosity, but also because the answers may shed light on the evolution of breast cancer. Now, studies carried out by Kordon and Smith at the National Cancer Institute have pointed the way toward a new understanding of mammary stem cells and their progeny.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.subjectBreast Canceren
dc.subject.meshAnimals-
dc.subject.meshBreast-
dc.subject.meshBreast Neoplasms-
dc.subject.meshCell Division-
dc.subject.meshEpithelial Cells-
dc.subject.meshFemale-
dc.subject.meshHumans-
dc.subject.meshMammary Glands, Animal-
dc.subject.meshStem Cells-
dc.titleEpithelial stem cells in the mammary gland: casting light into dark corners.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentTumour Biochemistry Laboratory, Clinical Research Department, Christie Hospital NHS Trust, Wilmslow Road, Manchester M20 4BX, England. EAnderson@picr.man.ac.uken
dc.identifier.journalBreast Cancer Researchen

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