Modification of murine adult haemopoiesis and response to methyl nitrosourea following exposure to radiation at different developmental stages.

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10541/88633
Title:
Modification of murine adult haemopoiesis and response to methyl nitrosourea following exposure to radiation at different developmental stages.
Authors:
Hoyes, Katherine P; Hendry, Jolyon H; Lord, Brian I
Abstract:
PURPOSE: To investigate the hypothesis that the developmental phase at which an individual encounters radiation damage affects its long-term sensitivity to a subsequent tumourigenic insult. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Either the pregnant C57B16 mouse was exposed to 137Cs gamma-rays at 4 or 15 days post-conception (embryonic and foetal stages respectively) or BDF1 offspring were irradiated at 4 or 21 days of age (neonatal and juvenile stages). Offspring were either assayed for changes in bone marrow stem cells and committed progenitors at 6, 12 and 18 weeks of age, or injected with the chemical carcinogen methyl nitrosourea (MNU) at 10 weeks of age and monitored for onset of neoplasia. RESULTS: Gamma-irradiation induced a persistent long-term deficit in stem cells in all irradiated animals, with the foetal stage appearing most radiosensitive. However, femoral cellularity, committed progenitor cell numbers and peripheral blood counts were unaffected. When offspring were exposed to MNU, the incidence of malignancy was significantly enhanced in animals irradiated at the foetal, neonatal and juvenile stages. CONCLUSIONS: This study has shown that exposure to ionizing radiation at the foetal, neonate or juvenile stages of development induces residual haemopoietic damage and increases oncogenic susceptibility to a subsequent exposure to MNU.
Affiliation:
Cancer Research Campaign Section of Haemopoietic Cell and Gene Therapeutics, Paterson Institute for Cancer Research, Christie Hospital NHS Trust, Manchester, UK. khoyes@picr.man.ac.uk
Citation:
Modification of murine adult haemopoiesis and response to methyl nitrosourea following exposure to radiation at different developmental stages. 2000, 76 (1):77-85 Int. J. Radiat. Biol.
Journal:
International Journal of Radiation Biology
Issue Date:
Jan-2000
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10541/88633
DOI:
10.1080/095530000139032
PubMed ID:
10665960
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
0955-3002
Appears in Collections:
All Paterson Institute for Cancer Research

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorHoyes, Katherine Pen
dc.contributor.authorHendry, Jolyon Hen
dc.contributor.authorLord, Brian Ien
dc.date.accessioned2009-12-29T10:30:11Z-
dc.date.available2009-12-29T10:30:11Z-
dc.date.issued2000-01-
dc.identifier.citationModification of murine adult haemopoiesis and response to methyl nitrosourea following exposure to radiation at different developmental stages. 2000, 76 (1):77-85 Int. J. Radiat. Biol.en
dc.identifier.issn0955-3002-
dc.identifier.pmid10665960-
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/095530000139032-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10541/88633-
dc.description.abstractPURPOSE: To investigate the hypothesis that the developmental phase at which an individual encounters radiation damage affects its long-term sensitivity to a subsequent tumourigenic insult. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Either the pregnant C57B16 mouse was exposed to 137Cs gamma-rays at 4 or 15 days post-conception (embryonic and foetal stages respectively) or BDF1 offspring were irradiated at 4 or 21 days of age (neonatal and juvenile stages). Offspring were either assayed for changes in bone marrow stem cells and committed progenitors at 6, 12 and 18 weeks of age, or injected with the chemical carcinogen methyl nitrosourea (MNU) at 10 weeks of age and monitored for onset of neoplasia. RESULTS: Gamma-irradiation induced a persistent long-term deficit in stem cells in all irradiated animals, with the foetal stage appearing most radiosensitive. However, femoral cellularity, committed progenitor cell numbers and peripheral blood counts were unaffected. When offspring were exposed to MNU, the incidence of malignancy was significantly enhanced in animals irradiated at the foetal, neonatal and juvenile stages. CONCLUSIONS: This study has shown that exposure to ionizing radiation at the foetal, neonate or juvenile stages of development induces residual haemopoietic damage and increases oncogenic susceptibility to a subsequent exposure to MNU.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.subjectBone Marrow Canceren
dc.subjectRadiation-Induced Canceren
dc.subjectHaematopoiesisen
dc.subject.meshAge Factors-
dc.subject.meshAnimals-
dc.subject.meshBody Weight-
dc.subject.meshBone Marrow Neoplasms-
dc.subject.meshCarcinogens-
dc.subject.meshCell Count-
dc.subject.meshDose-Response Relationship, Radiation-
dc.subject.meshFemale-
dc.subject.meshGamma Rays-
dc.subject.meshHematopoiesis-
dc.subject.meshLitter Size-
dc.subject.meshMale-
dc.subject.meshMethylnitrosourea-
dc.subject.meshMice-
dc.subject.meshMice, Inbred C57BL-
dc.subject.meshNeoplasms, Radiation-Induced-
dc.subject.meshStem Cells-
dc.titleModification of murine adult haemopoiesis and response to methyl nitrosourea following exposure to radiation at different developmental stages.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentCancer Research Campaign Section of Haemopoietic Cell and Gene Therapeutics, Paterson Institute for Cancer Research, Christie Hospital NHS Trust, Manchester, UK. khoyes@picr.man.ac.uken
dc.identifier.journalInternational Journal of Radiation Biologyen

Related articles on PubMed

All Items in Christie are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.