Sensitivity to sunburn is associated with susceptibility to ultraviolet radiation-induced suppression of cutaneous cell-mediated immunity.

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10541/88623
Title:
Sensitivity to sunburn is associated with susceptibility to ultraviolet radiation-induced suppression of cutaneous cell-mediated immunity.
Authors:
Kelly, Deirdre A; Young, Antony R; McGregor, Jane M; Seed, Paul T; Potten, Christopher S; Walker, Susan L
Abstract:
Skin cancer incidence is highest in white-skinned people. Within this group, skin types I/II (sun sensitive/tan poorly) are at greater risk than skin types III/IV (sun tolerant/tan well). Studies in mice demonstrate that ultraviolet radiation (UVR)-induced suppression of cell-mediated immune function plays an important role in the development of skin cancer and induces a susceptibility to infectious disease. A similar role is suspected in humans, but we lack quantitative human data to make risk assessments of ambient solar exposure on human health. This study demonstrates that ambient levels of solar UVR, typically experienced within 1 h of exposure to noonday summer sunlight, can suppress contact hypersensitivity (CHS) responses in healthy white-skinned humans in vivo (n = 93). There was a linear relationship between increase in erythema and suppression of CHS (P < 0.001), and a moderate sunburn (two minimal erythema doses [2 MED]) was sufficient to suppress CHS in all volunteers by 93%. However, a single suberythemal exposure of either 0.25 or 0.5 MED suppressed CHS responses by 50 and 80%, respectively, in skin types I/II, whereas 1 MED only suppressed CHS by 40% in skin types III/IV. The two- to threefold greater sensitivity of skin types I/II for a given level of sunburn may play a role in their greater sensitivity to skin cancer.
Affiliation:
Department of Photobiology, St. John's Institute of Dermatology, Guy's , King's and St. Thomas' School of Medicine, King's College London, University of London, St. Thomas Hospital, London, UK.
Citation:
Sensitivity to sunburn is associated with susceptibility to ultraviolet radiation-induced suppression of cutaneous cell-mediated immunity. 2000, 191 (3):561-6 J. Exp. Med.
Journal:
The Journal of Experimental Medicine
Issue Date:
7-Feb-2000
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10541/88623
PubMed ID:
10662801
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
0022-1007
Appears in Collections:
All Paterson Institute for Cancer Research

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorKelly, Deirdre Aen
dc.contributor.authorYoung, Antony Ren
dc.contributor.authorMcGregor, Jane Men
dc.contributor.authorSeed, Paul Ten
dc.contributor.authorPotten, Christopher Sen
dc.contributor.authorWalker, Susan Len
dc.date.accessioned2009-12-29T11:00:57Z-
dc.date.available2009-12-29T11:00:57Z-
dc.date.issued2000-02-07-
dc.identifier.citationSensitivity to sunburn is associated with susceptibility to ultraviolet radiation-induced suppression of cutaneous cell-mediated immunity. 2000, 191 (3):561-6 J. Exp. Med.en
dc.identifier.issn0022-1007-
dc.identifier.pmid10662801-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10541/88623-
dc.description.abstractSkin cancer incidence is highest in white-skinned people. Within this group, skin types I/II (sun sensitive/tan poorly) are at greater risk than skin types III/IV (sun tolerant/tan well). Studies in mice demonstrate that ultraviolet radiation (UVR)-induced suppression of cell-mediated immune function plays an important role in the development of skin cancer and induces a susceptibility to infectious disease. A similar role is suspected in humans, but we lack quantitative human data to make risk assessments of ambient solar exposure on human health. This study demonstrates that ambient levels of solar UVR, typically experienced within 1 h of exposure to noonday summer sunlight, can suppress contact hypersensitivity (CHS) responses in healthy white-skinned humans in vivo (n = 93). There was a linear relationship between increase in erythema and suppression of CHS (P < 0.001), and a moderate sunburn (two minimal erythema doses [2 MED]) was sufficient to suppress CHS in all volunteers by 93%. However, a single suberythemal exposure of either 0.25 or 0.5 MED suppressed CHS responses by 50 and 80%, respectively, in skin types I/II, whereas 1 MED only suppressed CHS by 40% in skin types III/IV. The two- to threefold greater sensitivity of skin types I/II for a given level of sunburn may play a role in their greater sensitivity to skin cancer.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.subject.meshAdult-
dc.subject.meshButtocks-
dc.subject.meshDinitrochlorobenzene-
dc.subject.meshDisease Susceptibility-
dc.subject.meshDose-Response Relationship, Radiation-
dc.subject.meshDown-Regulation-
dc.subject.meshErythema-
dc.subject.meshEuropean Continental Ancestry Group-
dc.subject.meshGreat Britain-
dc.subject.meshHumans-
dc.subject.meshImmunity, Cellular-
dc.subject.meshIrritants-
dc.subject.meshSeasons-
dc.subject.meshSkin-
dc.subject.meshSunburn-
dc.subject.meshUltraviolet Rays-
dc.titleSensitivity to sunburn is associated with susceptibility to ultraviolet radiation-induced suppression of cutaneous cell-mediated immunity.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Photobiology, St. John's Institute of Dermatology, Guy's , King's and St. Thomas' School of Medicine, King's College London, University of London, St. Thomas Hospital, London, UK.en
dc.identifier.journalThe Journal of Experimental Medicineen

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