Differentiated thyroid cancer: lobectomy and radioiodine, a treatment suitable for all cases?

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10541/87909
Title:
Differentiated thyroid cancer: lobectomy and radioiodine, a treatment suitable for all cases?
Authors:
Allan, Ernest; Owens, Susan E; Waller, M L
Abstract:
When treating differentiated carcinoma of the thyroid, lobectomy is the minimum surgical requirement, but there is a strong case for ablation of the whole gland. Controversy centres on the management of the contralateral lobe, which may be ablated by total thyroidectomy, by near total thyroidectomy and ablation of thyroid fragments by 131I, or by 131I alone. Operative morbidity is increased after total thyroidectomy compared with lobectomy. However, radioactive 131I ablation of the contralateral lobe is associated with a longer period of hospitalization than if radioactive 131I is given to ablate residual fragments of thyroid tissue after total thyroidectomy. The use of lobectomy may lead to a higher incidence of patients requiring more than one administration of 131I. The evidence available indicates that radioactive 131I ablation of the contralateral lobe is a safe procedure unless tumour deposits within this lobe are large enough to be visualized on an ultrasound scan, when total thyroidectomy becomes mandatory. Clinical trials are necessary to test this hypothesis.
Affiliation:
Department of Clinical Oncology, Christie Hospital NHS Trust, Manchester, UK.
Citation:
Differentiated thyroid cancer: lobectomy and radioiodine, a treatment suitable for all cases? 1999, 20 (11):983-9 Nucl Med Commun
Journal:
Nuclear Medicine Communications
Issue Date:
Nov-1999
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10541/87909
PubMed ID:
10572907
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
0143-3636
Appears in Collections:
All Christie Publications

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorAllan, Ernesten
dc.contributor.authorOwens, Susan Een
dc.contributor.authorWaller, M Len
dc.date.accessioned2009-12-14T15:54:56Z-
dc.date.available2009-12-14T15:54:56Z-
dc.date.issued1999-11-
dc.identifier.citationDifferentiated thyroid cancer: lobectomy and radioiodine, a treatment suitable for all cases? 1999, 20 (11):983-9 Nucl Med Communen
dc.identifier.issn0143-3636-
dc.identifier.pmid10572907-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10541/87909-
dc.description.abstractWhen treating differentiated carcinoma of the thyroid, lobectomy is the minimum surgical requirement, but there is a strong case for ablation of the whole gland. Controversy centres on the management of the contralateral lobe, which may be ablated by total thyroidectomy, by near total thyroidectomy and ablation of thyroid fragments by 131I, or by 131I alone. Operative morbidity is increased after total thyroidectomy compared with lobectomy. However, radioactive 131I ablation of the contralateral lobe is associated with a longer period of hospitalization than if radioactive 131I is given to ablate residual fragments of thyroid tissue after total thyroidectomy. The use of lobectomy may lead to a higher incidence of patients requiring more than one administration of 131I. The evidence available indicates that radioactive 131I ablation of the contralateral lobe is a safe procedure unless tumour deposits within this lobe are large enough to be visualized on an ultrasound scan, when total thyroidectomy becomes mandatory. Clinical trials are necessary to test this hypothesis.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.subjectThyroid Canceren
dc.subject.meshCombined Modality Therapy-
dc.subject.meshHumans-
dc.subject.meshIodine Radioisotopes-
dc.subject.meshRadiometry-
dc.subject.meshThyroid Neoplasms-
dc.subject.meshThyroidectomy-
dc.titleDifferentiated thyroid cancer: lobectomy and radioiodine, a treatment suitable for all cases?en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Clinical Oncology, Christie Hospital NHS Trust, Manchester, UK.en
dc.identifier.journalNuclear Medicine Communicationsen

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