2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10541/85597
Title:
Protection against mucosal injury by growth factors and cytokines.
Authors:
Booth, Dawn; Potten, Christopher S
Abstract:
This article provides an overview of published studies in which growth factors and cytokines were used to modify the sensitivity of intestinal stem cells to a dose of radiation. In these experiments, growth factors were used to manipulate the sensitivity of stem cells in the gastrointestinal tract to reduce the severity of gastrointestinal mucositis in cancer therapy patients. Transforming growth factor beta3, interleukin 11, and keratinocyte growth factor were used. All three agents, given according to appropriate protocols, can result in a threefold to fourfold increase in the number of intestinal stem cells that survive a dose of radiation therapy. This result was assessed by using the crypt microcolony assay of stem cell functional capacity. The changes in stem cell survival that were observed resulted in increased animal survival. This increased survival was taken as a surrogate for improvement in patient well-being. The severity of diarrhea, a marker of functional impairment, was concomitantly reduced.
Affiliation:
Cancer Research Campaign Epithelial Biology Group, Paterson Institute for Cancer Research, Christie Hospital, Manchester, UK.
Citation:
Protection against mucosal injury by growth factors and cytokines. 2001 (29):16-20 J. Natl. Cancer Inst. Monographs
Journal:
Journal of the National Cancer Institute. Monographs
Issue Date:
2001
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10541/85597
PubMed ID:
11694560
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
1052-6773
Appears in Collections:
All Paterson Institute for Cancer Research

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorBooth, Dawnen
dc.contributor.authorPotten, Christopher Sen
dc.date.accessioned2009-11-06T16:02:58Z-
dc.date.available2009-11-06T16:02:58Z-
dc.date.issued2001-
dc.identifier.citationProtection against mucosal injury by growth factors and cytokines. 2001 (29):16-20 J. Natl. Cancer Inst. Monographsen
dc.identifier.issn1052-6773-
dc.identifier.pmid11694560-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10541/85597-
dc.description.abstractThis article provides an overview of published studies in which growth factors and cytokines were used to modify the sensitivity of intestinal stem cells to a dose of radiation. In these experiments, growth factors were used to manipulate the sensitivity of stem cells in the gastrointestinal tract to reduce the severity of gastrointestinal mucositis in cancer therapy patients. Transforming growth factor beta3, interleukin 11, and keratinocyte growth factor were used. All three agents, given according to appropriate protocols, can result in a threefold to fourfold increase in the number of intestinal stem cells that survive a dose of radiation therapy. This result was assessed by using the crypt microcolony assay of stem cell functional capacity. The changes in stem cell survival that were observed resulted in increased animal survival. This increased survival was taken as a surrogate for improvement in patient well-being. The severity of diarrhea, a marker of functional impairment, was concomitantly reduced.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.subjectDiarrhoeaen
dc.subject.meshAnimals-
dc.subject.meshCell Survival-
dc.subject.meshCytokines-
dc.subject.meshDiarrhea-
dc.subject.meshDose-Response Relationship, Drug-
dc.subject.meshFibroblast Growth Factor 7-
dc.subject.meshFibroblast Growth Factors-
dc.subject.meshGrowth Substances-
dc.subject.meshHumans-
dc.subject.meshInterleukin-11-
dc.subject.meshMice-
dc.subject.meshMice, Inbred C57BL-
dc.subject.meshMucous Membrane-
dc.subject.meshRadiotherapy-
dc.subject.meshStem Cells-
dc.subject.meshTime Factors-
dc.subject.meshTransforming Growth Factor beta-
dc.subject.meshTransforming Growth Factor beta3-
dc.titleProtection against mucosal injury by growth factors and cytokines.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentCancer Research Campaign Epithelial Biology Group, Paterson Institute for Cancer Research, Christie Hospital, Manchester, UK.en
dc.identifier.journalJournal of the National Cancer Institute. Monographsen
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