2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10541/85524
Title:
Tanning salon exposure and molecular alterations.
Authors:
Whitmore, S Elizabeth; Morison, Warwick L; Potten, Christopher S; Chadwick, Caroline A
Abstract:
BACKGROUND: Human studies of the short-term cellular effects of tanning salon exposures are lacking. Findings of such studies may prove extremely helpful in educating consumers considering or currently attending tanning salons. OBJECTIVE: Our purpose was to determine whether tanning salon exposure causes DNA alterations and p53 protein expression in epidermal keratinocytes and/or circulating peripheral lymphocytes. METHODS: Eleven subjects received 10 full-body tanning salon exposures over a 2-week period. UV-induced DNA cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers and p53 protein expression were examined, comparing pretreatment peripheral blood lymphocytes and epidermal biopsy specimens with analogous specimens obtained after the 10 tanning salon exposures. RESULTS: Cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers in DNA and p53 protein expression were detected in epidermal keratinocytes, but were absent in lymphocytes. CONCLUSION: Similar to outdoor sun exposure, short-term recreational tanning salon exposure causes molecular alterations believed essential in the development of skin cancer.
Affiliation:
Department of Dermatology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21205, USA.
Citation:
Tanning salon exposure and molecular alterations. 2001, 44 (5):775-80 J. Am. Acad. Dermatol.
Journal:
Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology
Issue Date:
May-2001
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10541/85524
DOI:
10.1067/mjd.2001.112581
PubMed ID:
11312423
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
0190-9622
Appears in Collections:
All Paterson Institute for Cancer Research

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorWhitmore, S Elizabethen
dc.contributor.authorMorison, Warwick Len
dc.contributor.authorPotten, Christopher Sen
dc.contributor.authorChadwick, Caroline Aen
dc.date.accessioned2009-11-06T10:49:56Z-
dc.date.available2009-11-06T10:49:56Z-
dc.date.issued2001-05-
dc.identifier.citationTanning salon exposure and molecular alterations. 2001, 44 (5):775-80 J. Am. Acad. Dermatol.en
dc.identifier.issn0190-9622-
dc.identifier.pmid11312423-
dc.identifier.doi10.1067/mjd.2001.112581-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10541/85524-
dc.description.abstractBACKGROUND: Human studies of the short-term cellular effects of tanning salon exposures are lacking. Findings of such studies may prove extremely helpful in educating consumers considering or currently attending tanning salons. OBJECTIVE: Our purpose was to determine whether tanning salon exposure causes DNA alterations and p53 protein expression in epidermal keratinocytes and/or circulating peripheral lymphocytes. METHODS: Eleven subjects received 10 full-body tanning salon exposures over a 2-week period. UV-induced DNA cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers and p53 protein expression were examined, comparing pretreatment peripheral blood lymphocytes and epidermal biopsy specimens with analogous specimens obtained after the 10 tanning salon exposures. RESULTS: Cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers in DNA and p53 protein expression were detected in epidermal keratinocytes, but were absent in lymphocytes. CONCLUSION: Similar to outdoor sun exposure, short-term recreational tanning salon exposure causes molecular alterations believed essential in the development of skin cancer.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.subjectTumour Suppressor Protein p53en
dc.subject.meshAdolescent-
dc.subject.meshAdult-
dc.subject.meshCommerce-
dc.subject.meshDNA Damage-
dc.subject.meshFemale-
dc.subject.meshHumans-
dc.subject.meshImmunohistochemistry-
dc.subject.meshKeratinocytes-
dc.subject.meshMale-
dc.subject.meshPyrimidine Dimers-
dc.subject.meshReference Values-
dc.subject.meshTumor Suppressor Protein p53-
dc.subject.meshUltraviolet Rays-
dc.subject.meshUnited States-
dc.titleTanning salon exposure and molecular alterations.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Dermatology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21205, USA.en
dc.identifier.journalJournal of the American Academy of Dermatologyen

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