Complementary therapists' motivation to work in cancer/supportive and palliative care: a multi-centre case study.

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10541/85433
Title:
Complementary therapists' motivation to work in cancer/supportive and palliative care: a multi-centre case study.
Authors:
Mackereth, Peter A; Carter, Ann; Parkin, Sam; Stringer, Jacqui; Roberts, Dai; Long, Andrew; Todd, Chris; Caress, Ann-Louise
Abstract:
PURPOSE: To uncover complementary therapists' motivation to work in cancer/supportive and palliative care. METHOD: The study employed a multiple case-study design, involving three cancer/supportive and palliative care settings in the North West of England. A questionnaire survey (n=51) was undertaken, followed by semi-structured interviews with a subgroup of the sample (n=28). RESULTS: Participants had a mean age of 50 years, were predominantly female and had varied career backgrounds, including prior professional experience in healthcare, teaching and private complementary therapy practice. Motivation for working in cancer/supportive and palliative care included vocational drive with a desire to provide individualised treatment and adopt a person centred, empowering and caring approach; disillusionment with conventional care; career development and personal experience of cancer or other serious illness. CONCLUSION: Findings indicated that motivational factors for therapists working in cancer care/supportive and palliative care were varied and highlighted a combination of 'push and pull' factors, particularly for therapists who are also health care practitioners. Further research related to volunteering, sustainable services and support and training for therapists is required.
Affiliation:
The Christie Foundation NHS Trust, Manchester, University of Derby, UK. peter.mackereth@christie.nhs.uk
Citation:
Complementary therapists' motivation to work in cancer/supportive and palliative care: a multi-centre case study. 2009, 15 (3):161-5 Complement Ther Clin Pract
Journal:
Complementary Therapies in Clinical Practice
Issue Date:
Aug-2009
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10541/85433
DOI:
10.1016/j.ctcp.2009.03.004
PubMed ID:
19595418
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
1873-6947
Appears in Collections:
All Christie Publications ; Haematology

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorMackereth, Peter Aen
dc.contributor.authorCarter, Annen
dc.contributor.authorParkin, Samen
dc.contributor.authorStringer, Jacquien
dc.contributor.authorRoberts, Daien
dc.contributor.authorLong, Andrewen
dc.contributor.authorTodd, Chrisen
dc.contributor.authorCaress, Ann-Louiseen
dc.date.accessioned2009-11-05T13:09:56Z-
dc.date.available2009-11-05T13:09:56Z-
dc.date.issued2009-08-
dc.identifier.citationComplementary therapists' motivation to work in cancer/supportive and palliative care: a multi-centre case study. 2009, 15 (3):161-5 Complement Ther Clin Practen
dc.identifier.issn1873-6947-
dc.identifier.pmid19595418-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.ctcp.2009.03.004-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10541/85433-
dc.description.abstractPURPOSE: To uncover complementary therapists' motivation to work in cancer/supportive and palliative care. METHOD: The study employed a multiple case-study design, involving three cancer/supportive and palliative care settings in the North West of England. A questionnaire survey (n=51) was undertaken, followed by semi-structured interviews with a subgroup of the sample (n=28). RESULTS: Participants had a mean age of 50 years, were predominantly female and had varied career backgrounds, including prior professional experience in healthcare, teaching and private complementary therapy practice. Motivation for working in cancer/supportive and palliative care included vocational drive with a desire to provide individualised treatment and adopt a person centred, empowering and caring approach; disillusionment with conventional care; career development and personal experience of cancer or other serious illness. CONCLUSION: Findings indicated that motivational factors for therapists working in cancer care/supportive and palliative care were varied and highlighted a combination of 'push and pull' factors, particularly for therapists who are also health care practitioners. Further research related to volunteering, sustainable services and support and training for therapists is required.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.subjectCanceren
dc.subject.meshAdult-
dc.subject.meshAged-
dc.subject.meshAttitude of Health Personnel-
dc.subject.meshCareer Mobility-
dc.subject.meshComplementary Therapies-
dc.subject.meshEngland-
dc.subject.meshFemale-
dc.subject.meshHumans-
dc.subject.meshMale-
dc.subject.meshMiddle Aged-
dc.subject.meshMotivation-
dc.subject.meshNeoplasms-
dc.subject.meshPalliative Care-
dc.subject.meshQuestionnaires-
dc.subject.meshYoung Adult-
dc.titleComplementary therapists' motivation to work in cancer/supportive and palliative care: a multi-centre case study.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentThe Christie Foundation NHS Trust, Manchester, University of Derby, UK. peter.mackereth@christie.nhs.uken
dc.identifier.journalComplementary Therapies in Clinical Practiceen

Related articles on PubMed

All Items in Christie are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.