Sensitivity to radiation-induced chromosome damage may be a marker of genetic predisposition in young head and neck cancer patients.

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10541/84143
Title:
Sensitivity to radiation-induced chromosome damage may be a marker of genetic predisposition in young head and neck cancer patients.
Authors:
Papworth, R; Slevin, Nicholas J ( 0000-0002-3367-7013 ) ; Roberts, Stephen A; Scott, David
Abstract:
We previously showed that levels of chromosome damage induced by ionizing radiation were, on average, higher in G(2)and G(0)lymphocytes of breast cancer patients than of normal healthy controls, but that there was no correlation between the results in the two assays. We proposed that enhanced sensitivity to G(2)or G(0)irradiation was a marker of low-penetrance predisposition to breast cancer, and have recently demonstrated heritability of sensitivity in families of breast cancer cases. We have now applied these assays to patients with head and neck cancers, for whom there is epidemiological evidence of inherited predisposition in addition to environmental causes. The mean frequency of radiation-induced G(2)aberrations was higher in the 42 patients than in 27 normal controls, but not significantly so. However, cases less than 45 years old were significantly more sensitive than normals of the same age range (P = 0.046), whereas there was no difference between patients and normals of less than 45 years. Also, there was an inverse correlation between G(2)sensitivity and age for patients but not for normals. Radiation-induced micronuclei in G(0)cells were more frequent in 49 patients than in 31 normals (P = 0.056) but, as with the G(2)assay, the greatest difference was seen between early-onset patients and young normals. Again there was an inverse correlation with age for patients but not for normals. Six patients with enhanced toxicity to radiotherapy were G(2)tested and four other such patients were G(0)tested; levels of chromosome damage were not significantly greater than in patients with normal reactions. Both assays were used on 64 individuals (39 patients, 25 normals) and there was no significant correlation between the results. We suggest that a proportion of early-onset head and neck cancer patients are genetically predisposed and that each of the two assays detects a different subset of these cases.
Affiliation:
Department of Cancer Genetics, Paterson Institute for Cancer Research, Withington, Manchester, UK.
Citation:
Sensitivity to radiation-induced chromosome damage may be a marker of genetic predisposition in young head and neck cancer patients. 2001, 84 (6):776-82 Br. J. Cancer
Journal:
British Journal of Cancer
Issue Date:
23-Mar-2001
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10541/84143
DOI:
10.1054/bjoc.2000.1692
PubMed ID:
11259091
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
0007-0920
Appears in Collections:
All Christie Publications ; All Paterson Institute for Cancer Research

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorPapworth, Ren
dc.contributor.authorSlevin, Nicholas Jen
dc.contributor.authorRoberts, Stephen Aen
dc.contributor.authorScott, Daviden
dc.date.accessioned2009-10-13T09:15:55Z-
dc.date.available2009-10-13T09:15:55Z-
dc.date.issued2001-03-23-
dc.identifier.citationSensitivity to radiation-induced chromosome damage may be a marker of genetic predisposition in young head and neck cancer patients. 2001, 84 (6):776-82 Br. J. Canceren
dc.identifier.issn0007-0920-
dc.identifier.pmid11259091-
dc.identifier.doi10.1054/bjoc.2000.1692-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10541/84143-
dc.description.abstractWe previously showed that levels of chromosome damage induced by ionizing radiation were, on average, higher in G(2)and G(0)lymphocytes of breast cancer patients than of normal healthy controls, but that there was no correlation between the results in the two assays. We proposed that enhanced sensitivity to G(2)or G(0)irradiation was a marker of low-penetrance predisposition to breast cancer, and have recently demonstrated heritability of sensitivity in families of breast cancer cases. We have now applied these assays to patients with head and neck cancers, for whom there is epidemiological evidence of inherited predisposition in addition to environmental causes. The mean frequency of radiation-induced G(2)aberrations was higher in the 42 patients than in 27 normal controls, but not significantly so. However, cases less than 45 years old were significantly more sensitive than normals of the same age range (P = 0.046), whereas there was no difference between patients and normals of less than 45 years. Also, there was an inverse correlation between G(2)sensitivity and age for patients but not for normals. Radiation-induced micronuclei in G(0)cells were more frequent in 49 patients than in 31 normals (P = 0.056) but, as with the G(2)assay, the greatest difference was seen between early-onset patients and young normals. Again there was an inverse correlation with age for patients but not for normals. Six patients with enhanced toxicity to radiotherapy were G(2)tested and four other such patients were G(0)tested; levels of chromosome damage were not significantly greater than in patients with normal reactions. Both assays were used on 64 individuals (39 patients, 25 normals) and there was no significant correlation between the results. We suggest that a proportion of early-onset head and neck cancer patients are genetically predisposed and that each of the two assays detects a different subset of these cases.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.subjectHead and Neck Canceren
dc.subject.meshAdult-
dc.subject.meshAged-
dc.subject.meshChromosome Aberrations-
dc.subject.meshG0 Phase-
dc.subject.meshG2 Phase-
dc.subject.meshGenetic Markers-
dc.subject.meshGenetic Predisposition to Disease-
dc.subject.meshHead and Neck Neoplasms-
dc.subject.meshHumans-
dc.subject.meshMiddle Aged-
dc.subject.meshRadiation, Ionizing-
dc.titleSensitivity to radiation-induced chromosome damage may be a marker of genetic predisposition in young head and neck cancer patients.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Cancer Genetics, Paterson Institute for Cancer Research, Withington, Manchester, UK.en
dc.identifier.journalBritish Journal of Canceren

Related articles on PubMed

All Items in Christie are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.