Ovarian tissue harvested from lymphoma patients to preserve fertility may be safe for autotransplantation.

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10541/84127
Title:
Ovarian tissue harvested from lymphoma patients to preserve fertility may be safe for autotransplantation.
Authors:
Kim, S Samuel; Radford, John A ( 0000-0001-7898-2786 ) ; Harris, Martin; Varley, Jennifer; Rutherford, Anthony J; Lieberman, Brian A; Shalet, Stephen M; Gosden, Roger
Abstract:
BACKGROUND: Ovarian failure is a common sequel to chemo/radiotherapy in patients successfully treated for cancer. Harvesting, cryopreserving and subsequently re-implanting ovarian cortical grafts can be used to re-establish reproductive potential in women with cancer. The safety issue, however, is of great concern because residual disease in autografted ovarian tissues might cause recrudescence of disease. METHODS: A total of 30 non-obese diabetic severe combined immunodeficient (NOD/LtSz-SCID) mice were individually xenografted s.c. with frozen-thawed ovarian tissue from 18 patients with lymphoma [13 Hodgkin's lymphoma (HL) and 5 non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL)]. The animals were autopsied at 16 weeks, or earlier if cachectic. The xenograft, liver, spleen, sternum, para-aortic lymph nodes and thymus were prepared for histology, immunohistochemistry and human DNA microsatellite analysis. RESULTS: None of the animals grafted with ovarian tissue from lymphoma patients developed disease. However, all 3 animals grafted with lymph node tissue from an NHL patient developed B-cell lymphomas that were confirmed as human in origin by DNA microsatellite analysis. CONCLUSION: Ovarian tissue harvested before high-dose chemotherapy for HL or NHL may not carry a risk of disease transmission by autotransplantation, although the possibility is difficult to exclude completely.
Affiliation:
Centre for Reproduction, Growth and Development, University of Leeds, Leeds, UK. medssk@att.net
Citation:
Ovarian tissue harvested from lymphoma patients to preserve fertility may be safe for autotransplantation. 2001, 16 (10):2056-60 Hum. Reprod.
Journal:
Human Reproduction
Issue Date:
Oct-2001
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10541/84127
PubMed ID:
11574491
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
0268-1161
Appears in Collections:
All Christie Publications ; All Paterson Institute for Cancer Research

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorKim, S Samuelen
dc.contributor.authorRadford, John Aen
dc.contributor.authorHarris, Martinen
dc.contributor.authorVarley, Jenniferen
dc.contributor.authorRutherford, Anthony Jen
dc.contributor.authorLieberman, Brian Aen
dc.contributor.authorShalet, Stephen Men
dc.contributor.authorGosden, Rogeren
dc.date.accessioned2009-10-13T09:31:01Z-
dc.date.available2009-10-13T09:31:01Z-
dc.date.issued2001-10-
dc.identifier.citationOvarian tissue harvested from lymphoma patients to preserve fertility may be safe for autotransplantation. 2001, 16 (10):2056-60 Hum. Reprod.en
dc.identifier.issn0268-1161-
dc.identifier.pmid11574491-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10541/84127-
dc.description.abstractBACKGROUND: Ovarian failure is a common sequel to chemo/radiotherapy in patients successfully treated for cancer. Harvesting, cryopreserving and subsequently re-implanting ovarian cortical grafts can be used to re-establish reproductive potential in women with cancer. The safety issue, however, is of great concern because residual disease in autografted ovarian tissues might cause recrudescence of disease. METHODS: A total of 30 non-obese diabetic severe combined immunodeficient (NOD/LtSz-SCID) mice were individually xenografted s.c. with frozen-thawed ovarian tissue from 18 patients with lymphoma [13 Hodgkin's lymphoma (HL) and 5 non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL)]. The animals were autopsied at 16 weeks, or earlier if cachectic. The xenograft, liver, spleen, sternum, para-aortic lymph nodes and thymus were prepared for histology, immunohistochemistry and human DNA microsatellite analysis. RESULTS: None of the animals grafted with ovarian tissue from lymphoma patients developed disease. However, all 3 animals grafted with lymph node tissue from an NHL patient developed B-cell lymphomas that were confirmed as human in origin by DNA microsatellite analysis. CONCLUSION: Ovarian tissue harvested before high-dose chemotherapy for HL or NHL may not carry a risk of disease transmission by autotransplantation, although the possibility is difficult to exclude completely.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.subjectCancer Invasivenessen
dc.subject.meshAdult-
dc.subject.meshAnimals-
dc.subject.meshFemale-
dc.subject.meshFertility-
dc.subject.meshHodgkin Disease-
dc.subject.meshHumans-
dc.subject.meshInfertility, Female-
dc.subject.meshLymphoma-
dc.subject.meshLymphoma, B-Cell-
dc.subject.meshLymphoma, Non-Hodgkin-
dc.subject.meshMice-
dc.subject.meshMice, SCID-
dc.subject.meshMicrosatellite Repeats-
dc.subject.meshNeoplasm Invasiveness-
dc.subject.meshOvary-
dc.subject.meshThymus Gland-
dc.subject.meshTissue and Organ Harvesting-
dc.subject.meshTransplantation, Autologous-
dc.subject.meshTransplantation, Heterologous-
dc.titleOvarian tissue harvested from lymphoma patients to preserve fertility may be safe for autotransplantation.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentCentre for Reproduction, Growth and Development, University of Leeds, Leeds, UK. medssk@att.neten
dc.identifier.journalHuman Reproductionen

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