2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10541/83574
Title:
Cancer vaccines and immunotherapy.
Authors:
Dermime, Said; Armstrong, Anne C; Hawkins, Robert E; Stern, Peter L
Abstract:
It is now clear that many human tumour antigens can be recognised by the immune system. These tumour antigens can be classified into several groups including cancer-testis, differentiation, tissue specific, over-expressed, and viral-associated antigens. In many cases, there is a known molecular basis of carcinogenesis which provides the explanation for the differentiated expression of these antigens in tumours compared with normal cells. Improved understanding of the biology of the immune response, particularly of immune recognition and activation of T-cells, allow better design of vaccines. Pre-clinical comparative studies allow evaluation of optimal vaccine strategies which can then be delivered to the clinic. Currently, a range of cancer vaccines are being tested including those using tumour cells, proteins, peptides, viral vectors, DNA or dendritic cells. Ultimately, this research should give rise to an entirely new modality of cancer treatments.
Affiliation:
CRC Department of Medical Oncology, University of Manchester and Paterson Institute for Cancer Research, Christie Hospital NHS Trust, Manchester, UK.
Citation:
Cancer vaccines and immunotherapy. 2002, 62:149-62 Br. Med. Bull.
Journal:
British Medical Bulletin
Issue Date:
2002
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10541/83574
DOI:
10.1093/bmb/62.1.149
PubMed ID:
12176857
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
0007-1420
Appears in Collections:
All Paterson Institute for Cancer Research

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorDermime, Said-
dc.contributor.authorArmstrong, Anne C-
dc.contributor.authorHawkins, Robert E-
dc.contributor.authorStern, Peter L-
dc.date.accessioned2009-10-05T15:26:51Z-
dc.date.available2009-10-05T15:26:51Z-
dc.date.issued2002-
dc.identifier.citationCancer vaccines and immunotherapy. 2002, 62:149-62 Br. Med. Bull.en
dc.identifier.issn0007-1420-
dc.identifier.pmid12176857-
dc.identifier.doi10.1093/bmb/62.1.149-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10541/83574-
dc.description.abstractIt is now clear that many human tumour antigens can be recognised by the immune system. These tumour antigens can be classified into several groups including cancer-testis, differentiation, tissue specific, over-expressed, and viral-associated antigens. In many cases, there is a known molecular basis of carcinogenesis which provides the explanation for the differentiated expression of these antigens in tumours compared with normal cells. Improved understanding of the biology of the immune response, particularly of immune recognition and activation of T-cells, allow better design of vaccines. Pre-clinical comparative studies allow evaluation of optimal vaccine strategies which can then be delivered to the clinic. Currently, a range of cancer vaccines are being tested including those using tumour cells, proteins, peptides, viral vectors, DNA or dendritic cells. Ultimately, this research should give rise to an entirely new modality of cancer treatments.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.subjectCanceren
dc.subjectCancer Antigensen
dc.subject.meshAntigens, Neoplasm-
dc.subject.meshCancer Vaccines-
dc.subject.meshHumans-
dc.subject.meshImmunotherapy-
dc.subject.meshNeoplasms-
dc.titleCancer vaccines and immunotherapy.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentCRC Department of Medical Oncology, University of Manchester and Paterson Institute for Cancer Research, Christie Hospital NHS Trust, Manchester, UK.en
dc.identifier.journalBritish Medical Bulletinen

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